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LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: The Quantum Moment

cover of ''The Quantum Moment: How Planck, Bohr, Einstein, and Heisenberg Taught Us to Love Uncertainty''

The Quantum Moment: How Planck, Bohr, Einstein, and Heisenberg Taught Us to Love Uncertainty by Robert P. Crease and Alfred Scharff Goldhaber

"...Robert P. Crease and Alfred Scharff Goldhaber...draw on their training and six years of co-teaching to dramatize the quantum's rocky path from scientific theory to public understanding. Together, they and their students explored missteps and mistranslations, jokes and gibberish, of public discussion about the quantum. Their book explores the quantum’s manifestations in everything from art and sculpture to the prose of John Updike and David Foster Wallace. The authors reveal the quantum's implications for knowledge, metaphor, intellectual exchange, and the contemporary world. Understanding and appreciating quantum language and imagery, and recognizing its misuse, is part of what it means to be an educated person today.

The result is a celebration of language at the interface of physics and culture, perfect for anyone drawn to the infinite variety of ideas.

from the publisher's website

This book is in the New Books area in front of the Reference Desk. Books not here in the Library can be requsted from storage (it only takes a day or so...). Instructions on how to request books are here.

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See our previous Books of the Week here.



LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: The Test: Why Our Schools are Obsessed with Standardized Testing

cover of ''The Test: Why Our Schools are Obsessed with Standardized Testing – But You Don't Have to Be''

The Test: Why Our Schools are Obsessed with Standardized Testing – But You Don't Have to Be by Anya Kamenetz

"Thorough research and illuminating interviews... With abundant data assembled in an accessible format, the book is a must-read for anyone in the educational system or any parent who has a child old enough to enter preschool… An informative and enlightening appraisal of the regimented tests that American schoolchildren of all ages are subjected to taking on a regular basis."—Kirkus Reviews

"The value of Anya Kamenetz's new book, The Test, lies in her ability to avoid the soapbox style of too many books on education reform today. Her journalistic talents coupled with her role as a mother of a student on the brink of testing humanizes this book, making it a perfect entry for parents who are too deep in the muck of testing to have the clarity of distance."—Boston Globe

—Review excerpts from Kamenetz's website

This book is in our Leisure Reading section, filed under K. Don't forget: books not here in the Library can be requsted from storage (it only takes a day or so...). Instructions on how to request books are here.

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LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: America’s Bitter Pill

cover of ''America's Bitter Pill: Money, Politics, Backroom Deals, and the Fight to Fix our Broken Healthcare System''

America's Bitter Pill: Money, Politics, Backroom Deals, and the Fight to Fix our Broken Healthcare System by Steven Brill

"In 2009 and 2010, the Obama administration waged a very public fight to pass a bill to overhaul America’s health-care system.

Its goals, on paper, were admirable: universal coverage, no more targeting for preexisting conditions, and depending on who you asked, curbing costs.

Unfortunately for the administration, and the Democratic Party, health-care reform would devolve into a narrative about a morally questionable legislative process, a midterm election anchor, and a botched implementation.

In a sweeping and spirited new book, America's Bitter Pill, journalist Steven Brill chronicles the surprisingly juicy tale of reform. Brill, whose Time cover story last spring about costs of care caused quite a stir, has focused an unsparing eye on a countless number of politicians, bureaucrats, lobbyists, activists, and industry types. The result is an exacting and always readable examination of how a good idea turned sour, how the public got screwed, and who is to blame."

O'Connor, William. "Steven Brill Explains Why the Obamacare Band-Aid Is so Pathetic." The Daily Beast. Newsweek/Daily Beast, 14 Jan. 2015. Web. 26 Mar. 2015.

This book is in our Leisure Reading section, filed under B. Don't forget: books not here in the Library can be requsted from storage (it only takes a day or so...). Instructions on how to request books are here.

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See our previous Books of the Week here.



LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: Sally Ride: America’s First Woman in Space

cover of ''Sally Ride: America's First Woman in Space''

Sally Ride: America's First Woman in Space by Lynn Sherr

"An award-winning journalist's revealing biography of Sally Ride (1951-2012), the first American woman in space. ...Sherr...first met Ride, a young Stanford-trained physicist, in 1981. Three years earlier, NASA had chosen Ride to join a group of five other women and 29 men to participate in the new space shuttle program. The group represented the very best minds America had to offer. But for the women, who were the first in NASA history to be selected for space flight, the challenge was even greater. They not only represented themselves as individuals, but their entire gender. As the first woman to actually go on a mission, Ride came under especially intense scrutiny from the media. Her ability to lead but also 'take orders like a trooper,' along with her wit and charm, endeared her to America and the world.

During the nine years she was associated with the space program, Ride's exemplary conduct 'transformed female astronauts from a punch line into a matter of national pride.' She returned to academia afterward and became a professor. Eager to use her notoriety to help young people, and especially girls, take an interest in math and science, she co-founded Sally Ride Science in 2001. However, the former astronaut was never entirely comfortable with her celebrity status and kept parts of her life hidden, including the fact that she was a lesbian. Though married during her years at NASA, Ride's true sexual orientation did not become public until her death, when her obituary mentioned that she had been survived by a female partner of nearly three decades. Sherr's book is important not simply because it memorializes an American icon. It pointedly reminds readers of the crippling burden of 'shame and fear' that even—and perhaps especially—the most golden heroes must bear in societies that cannot tolerate difference."

Sally Ride: America's First Woman in Space." Kirkus Reviews 82.8 (2014): 46. Library & Information Science Source. Web. 17 Mar. 2015.

This book is in the New Books area in front of the Reference Desk. Books not here in the Library can be requsted from storage (it only takes a day or so...). Instructions on how to request books are here.

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See our previous Books of the Week here.



LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: Men Explain Things To Me

cover of ''Men Explain Things To Me''

Men Explain Things To Me by Rebecca Solnit

"In her comic, scathing essay "Men Explain Things to Me," Rebecca Solnit takes on what often goes wrong in conversations between men and women. She writes about men who wrongly assume they know things and wrongly assume women don’t, about why this arises, and how this aspect of the gender wars works, airing some of her own hilariously awful encounters.

She ends on a serious note—because the ultimate problem is the silencing of women who have something to say, including those saying things like, "He’s trying to kill me!"

The updated edition of this national bestseller features two new essays, including Solnit's recent essay on the remarkable feminist conversation that arose in the wake of the 2014 Isla Vista killings."

from the publisher's website

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LaGuardia Library eBook of the Week: Ain’t Scared of Your Jail

cover of ''Ain't Scared of Your Jail: Arrest, Imprisonment, and the Civil Rights Movement''

Ain't Scared of Your Jail: Arrest, Imprisonment, and the Civil Rights Movement by Zoey A. Colley

"Imprisonment became a badge of honor for many protestors during the civil rights movement. With the popularization of expressions such as "jail-no-bail" and "jail-in," civil rights activists sought to transform arrest and imprisonment from something to be feared to a platform for the cause. Beyond Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s "Letters from the Birmingham Jail," there has been little discussion on the incarceration experiences of civil rights activists. In her debut book, Zoe Colley does what no historian has done before by following civil rights activists inside the southern jails and prisons to explore their treatment and the different responses that civil rights organizations had to mass arrest and imprisonment.

Colley focuses on the shift in philosophical and strategic responses of civil rights protestors from seeing jail as something to be avoided to seeing it as a way to further the cause. Imprisonment became a way to expose the evils of segregation, and highlighted to the rest of American society the injustice of southern racism. By drawing together the narratives of many individuals and organizations, Colley paints a clearer picture of how the incarceration of civil rights activists helped shape the course of the movement. She places imprisonment at the forefront of civil rights history and shows how these new attitudes toward arrest continue to impact contemporary society and shape strategies for civil disobedience."

from the publisher's website

This is an ebook available via the library's catalog.

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In Case You Missed It…

Welcome to Spring I 2015! We had a very busy Fall II here! In case you missed some of our news:



LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: brown girl dreaming

cover of ''brown girl dreaming''

brown girl dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson

Winner of National Book Award, Coretta Scott King Award, Newbery Honor, Sibert Honor

"Raised in South Carolina and New York, Woodson always felt halfway home in each place. In vivid poems, she shares what it was like to grow up as an African American in the 1960s and 1970s, living with the remnants of Jim Crow and her growing awareness of the Civil Rights movement. Touching and powerful, each poem is both accessible and emotionally charged, each line a glimpse into a child's soul as she searches for her place in the world. Woodson’s eloquent poetry also reflects the joy of finding her voice through writing stories, despite the fact that she struggled with reading as a child. Her love of stories inspired her and stayed with her, creating the first sparks of the gifted writer she was to become."

from the publisher’s website

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Chat with a LaGuardia Librarian

We have a beautiful Annex in room E-111 where a Librarian is always present to answer your research questions. But if you can't come to the Library or the Annex, you can still chat with a Librarian! Just click the Research Chat button on any page of our site and you'll be instantly connected to a LaGuardia Librarian—whether you're on or off-campus.

Ask a question today!



Library Annex Open in E111

The Library Media Resources Center is pleased to announce today's opening of E-111 as the Library Annex.

The Library Annex provides LaGuardia students, faculty and staff with research and information services, extra seating, and access to a small bank of computers. Students are also able to use their wireless devices.

The Library Annex hours are: Monday-Thursday, 9AM-7PM and Fridays, 9AM-5PM. Stop in and say hello!

photograph of Library Annex

photograph of reference area



LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: Black Against Empire

cover of ''Black Against Empire: The History and Politics of the Black Panther Party''

Black Against Empire: The History and Politics of the Black Panther Party Joshua Bloom and Waldo Martin

"In Oakland, California, in 1966, community college students Bobby Seale and Huey Newton armed themselves, began patrolling the police, and promised to prevent police brutality. Unlike the Civil Rights Movement that called for full citizenship rights for blacks within the U.S., the Black Panther Party rejected the legitimacy of the U.S. government and positioned itself as part of a global struggle against American imperialism. In the face of intense repression, the Party flourished, becoming the center of a revolutionary movement with offices in 68 U.S. cities and powerful allies around the world.

Black against Empire is the first comprehensive overview and analysis of the history and politics of the Black Panther Party. The authors analyze key political questions, such as why so many young black people across the country risked their lives for the revolution, why the Party grew most rapidly during the height of repression, and why allies abandoned the Party at its peak of influence. Bold, engrossing, and richly detailed, this book cuts through the mythology and obfuscation, revealing the political dynamics that drove the explosive growth of this revolutionary movement, and its disastrous unraveling. Informed by twelve years of meticulous archival research, as well as familiarity with most of the former Party leadership and many rank-and-file members, this book is the definitive history of one of the greatest challenges ever posed to American state power."

from the publisher’s website

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LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. The Climate

cover of ''This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. The Climate''

This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. The Climate by Naomi Klein

"The time for marginal fixes has expired, writes Klein. We will not be saved by toothless international agreements, spurious political bargains, outlandish geoengineering environmental groups in bed with corporations or magical thinking of any kind—and surely not by deregulating the capitalist system responsible for the crisis. Carbon emissions continue to rise, and greenhouse gases dangerously accumulate as the fossil fuel industry ramps up devastating extraction.

In part, Klein's narrative is a personal story about her own awakening to and increasing engagement with the climate issue. But this always-interesting polemic is built mostly on her interviews with experts, environmentalists and activists and her colorful on-site reporting from various international meetings and conferences and particularly from worldwide pockets of resistance to corporate bullying. "Blockadia," she calls these places, where communities have risen to oppose open-pit mining, fracking and pipelines. In them she finds hope for a grass-roots rebellion, a kind of "People's Shock" where push back against the aggressive energy industry can be a catalyst for advancing a range of policies dear to the progressive agenda.

Klein has no time for deniers of man-made global warming, but she credits right-wing ideologues with better understanding the high stakes, the vast scope of the changes necessary to meet the climate challenge. This awareness accounts for their vigorous opposition to the activists' docket and for the movement's consequent loss of momentum for the past decade. The author's journalism won't slow down the fossil fuel companies, but it surely holds out hope for activists looking to avert a disaster, for a widespread people's movement that, if it happens, "changes everything." A sharp analysis that is bound to be widely discussed, with all the usual suspects, depending on their politics, lining up to cheer or excoriate Klein.

"This Changes Everything: Capitalism Vs. The Climate." Kirkus Reviews 82.19 (2014): 206. Book Review Digest Plus (H.W. Wilson). Web. 2 Dec. 2014.

Do you disagree with the review or the book? Check Book Review Digest Plus or Academic Search Complete for other reviews and responses to this book.

You can request this book from storage if it is no longer in the New Books section (in front of the Reference Desk). Instructions on how to request books are here.

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See our previous Books of the Week here.



LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: Saving Normal

Cover of ''Saving normal: an insider's revolt against out-of-control psychiatric diagnosis, DSM-5, Big Pharma, and the medicalization of ordinary life''

Saving Normal: An Insider’s Revolt Against Out-of-Control Psychiatric Diagnosis, DSM-5, Big Pharma, and the Medicalization of Ordinary Life by Allen Frances

In Saving Normal, Francis …argues that labeling life problems as mental illness has serious long-term implications. It is a well-accepted notion… that disease does not exist until society agrees it does by perceiving, naming, and responding to it. Yet Frances criticizes the proliferation of mental diseases in DSM-5 (2013) and explores the social and personal consequences. He begins with a terse historical review of how "normal" has been defined, but ignores the legal profession's significant contributions to the debate.

Most of the book focuses on how the idea of normal remains elusive and argues that the medicalization of behavior leads to polypharmacy, misallocation of medical resources, multibillion-dollar profits for drug companies, and a lapse of personal and internal accountability for behavior...He asserts that transforming human behavior into the newly invented mental...may diminish human adaptability, diversity, and humanity."

Hamilton, D.B. "Frances, Allen. Saving Normal: An Insider's Revolt against Out-of-control Psychiatric Diagnosis, DSM-5, Big Pharma, and the Medicalization of Ordinary Life." CHOICE: Current Reviews for Academic Libraries Feb. 2014: 1043+. Literature Resource Center. Web. 9 Dec. 2014.

You can request this book from storage if it is no longer in the New Books section (in front of the Reference Desk). Instructions on how to request books are here.

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See our previous Books of the Week here.



Free Earplugs at the Reference Desk

box of Library earplugs

We know the Library can sometimes be a bit noisy because of our renovation. To help keep everyone focused, we have free earplugs at the Reference Desk (don't worry — they're individually wrapped). Just make sure you take them out before you go to class!

Thanks to Hunter for the great idea (and for the great box)!



LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption

cover of ''Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption''

Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption by Bryan Stevenson

As a young Harvard law student testing himself in an internship in Georgia, Stevenson visited death-row inmates and saw firsthand the injustices suffered by the poor and disadvantaged, how too many had been railroaded into convictions with inadequate legal representation. The visit made such an impression on Stevenson that he started the Equal Justice Institute in Montgomery, Alabama. One of his first clients was Walter McMillian, a young black man accused of murdering a white woman and imprisoned on death row even before he was tried.

Stevenson alternates chapters on the shocking miscarriage of justice in McMillian's case, including police and prosecutorial misconduct, with other startling cases. The war on drugs and tough-on-crime political postures have resulted in hundreds of juveniles sentenced to life imprisonment without parole for nonhomicidal offenses. Among the cases Stevenson cites: a 14-year-old condemned to death for killing his mother’s abusive boyfriend and a mentally ill adolescent girl condemned to life in prison for second-degree murder for the death of young boys killed in a fire she started accidentally. Through these cases and others, Stevenson details changes in victims' rights, incarceration of juveniles, death penalty reforms, inflexible sentencing laws, and the continued practices of injustice that see too many juveniles, minorities, and mentally ill people imprisoned in a frenzy of mass incarceration ien the U.S. A passionate account of the ways our nation thwarts justice and inhumanely punishes the poor and disadvantaged.

Bush, Vanessa. "Just Mercy." The Booklist 111.4 (2014): 6-7. ProQuest Education Journals. Web. 10 Jan. 2015.

This book is in Leisure Reading (the maroon shelves in Periodicals.) It is shelved under the author's last name (Stevenson).

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See our previous Books of the Week here.