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LaGuardia Library Book(s) of the Week: Leisure Reading

map to the Leisure Collection

Pick one just for fun!

The Library has a Leisure Reading collection which includes books we think LaGuardia students, staff and faculty might enjoy. It includes popular fiction, nonfiction, biographies, and self-help books.

The rest of the collection is shelved near the windows and the periodicals. Ask a librarian if you need help or if you have any questions about t his collection.

cover of ''The Butler'' cover of ''After Her''

cover of ''The Buy Side'' cover of ''Ghost Bride''

You can also see our Leisure Reading in the catalog.

See our previous Books of the Week here.



LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: How Sex Became a Civil Liberty

Cover of ''How Sex Became a Civil Liberty''

How Sex Became a Civil Liberty by Leigh Ann Wheeler

"How Sex Became a Civil Liberty is the first book to show how and why we have come to see sexual expression, sexual practice, and sexual privacy as fundamental rights. Using rich archival sources and oral interviews, historian Leigh Ann Wheeler shows how the private lives of women and men in the American Civil Liberties Union shaped their understanding of sexual rights as they built the constitutional foundation for the twentieth-century's sexual revolutions.

...

Wheeler explores the ACLU's prominent role in nearly every major court decision related to sexuality while examining how the ACLU also promoted its agenda through grassroots activism, political action, and public education. She shows how the ACLU helped to collapse distinctions between public and private in ways that privileged access to sexual expression over protection from it. Thanks largely to the organization's work, abortion and birth control are legal, coerced sterilization is rare, sexually explicit material is readily available, and gay rights are becoming a reality. But this book does not simply applaud the creation of a sex-saturated culture and the arming of citizens with sexual rights; it shows how hard-won rights for some often impinged upon freedoms held dear by others."

From the publisher's website

This book will be shelved at KF9325 .W47 2013 with other books on law once it is not a "New book".

Ask a librarian to help you find this or other books.

See our previous Books of the Week here.



LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: Habitats: Private Lives in the Big City

Cover of ''Habitats: Private Lives in the Big City''

Habitats: Private Lives in the Big City by Constance Rosenblum

"There may be eight million stories in the Naked City, but there are also nearly three million dwelling places, ranging from Park Avenue palaces to Dickensian garrets and encompassing much in between. The doorways to these residences are tantalizing portals opening onto largely invisible lives. Habitats offers 40 vivid and intimate stories about how New Yorkers really live in their brownstones, their apartments, their mansions, their lofts, and as a whole presents a rich, multi-textured portrait of what it means to make a home in the world’s most varied and powerful city.

These essays, expanded versions of a selection of the Habitats column published in the Real Estate section of The New York Times, take readers to both familiar and remote sections of the city—to history-rich townhouses, to low-income housing projects, to out-of-the-way places far from the beaten track, to every corner of the five boroughs—and introduce them to a wide variety of families and individuals who call New York home. These pieces reveal a great deal about the city's past and its rich store of historic dwellings. Along with exploring the deep and even mystical connections people feel to the place where they live, these pieces, taken as a whole, offer a mosaic of domestic life in one of the world’s most fascinating cities and a vivid portrait of the true meaning of home in the 21st-century metropolis."

From the publisher's website

This book will be shelved at HD7304 .N5 R59 2013 with other books on housing once it is not a "New book".

Ask a librarian to help you find this or other books.

See our previous Books of the Week here.



Going Beyond Google Again

Profs. Jane Devine and Francine Egger-Sider's latest book, Going Beyond Google Again, was featured in the March/April 2014 issue of American Libraries: http://www.americanlibrariesmagazine.org/issue/marchapril-2014 (p. 48-51) [Direct link to the article in Academic Search Complete here: https://mail.lagcc.cuny.edu/viplogin/default.aspx?redirect=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h&AN=94770773&site=ehost-live] Take a look and check out a great selection of specialized online research tools that you might not have seen before.



LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: Envisioning Emancipation

Cover of ''Envisioning Emancipation: Black Americans and the End of Slavery''

Envisioning Emancipation: Black Americans and the End of Slavery by Deborah Willis and Barbara Krauthamer

"The Emancipation Proclamation is one of the most important documents in American history. As we commemorate its 150th anniversary, what do we really know about those who experienced slavery?

In their pioneering book, Envisioning Emancipation, renowned photographic historian Deborah Willis and historian of slavery Barbara Krauthamer have amassed 150 photographs—some never before published—from the antebellum days of the 1850s through the New Deal era of the 1930s. The authors vividly display the seismic impact of emancipation on African Americans born before and after the Proclamation, providing a perspective on freedom and slavery and a way to understand the photos as documents of engagement, action, struggle, and aspiration.

Envisioning Emancipation illustrates what freedom looked like for black Americans in the Civil War era. From photos of the enslaved on plantations and African American soldiers and camp workers in the Union Army to Juneteenth celebrations, slave reunions, and portraits of black families and workers in the American South, the images in this book challenge perceptions of slavery. They show not only what the subjects emphasized about themselves but also the ways Americans of all colors and genders opposed slavery and marked its end.

Filled with powerful images of lives too often ignored or erased from historical records, Envisioning Emancipation provides a new perspective on American culture.

From the publisher's website

This book will be shelved at HE 185.2 W68 2013 with other books on African-American history once it is not a "New book".

Ask a librarian to help you find this or other books.

See our previous Books of the Week here.



In Case You Missed It: Black History Month at the Library

Black History Month is over, but you can still check-out the Library's Black History Month display, right outside of the Library.

closeup photo of the Library's Black History Month display

photo of the Library's Black History Month display

For more on the display, be sure to visit our Tumblr and follow us on Instagram.



LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: Munich 1972

Cover of ''Munich 1972: Tragedy, Terror, and Triumph at the Olympic Games''

Munich 1972: Tragedy, Terror, and Triumph at the Olympic Games by David Clay Large

"This timely book reminds readers that politics have always shaped the Olympic Games. A respected authority on the Third Reich, Large (Montana State Univ.; Nazi Games) explains how the XX Olympic Games in Munich marked a turning point in Olympic and sports history generally. He thoroughly details the murder of Israeli athletes by pro-Palestine Black September terrorists.

The author's description is especially valuable because he places the attack within the larger contexts of contemporary international tensions (Cold War, Vietnam War protests, African decolonization, Middle Eastern conflicts) and West Germany's attempt to distance itself from the so-called "Nazi Olympics" of 1936 Berlin. Munich 1972 also describes the first superexpensive Olympic Games, complete with artist competitions, extravagant ceremonies, and huge building projects. Large pays great attention to the competition itself and writes vibrantly about many sports. The book therefore nicely blends the work of scholar and fan. While his nuanced picture of West Germany's security failures sheds light on the modern history of Germany and sports, overall Large does not break new scholarly ground. His pitch is broader. This thoughtful, readable piece on a major event of the modern era will appeal to many people."

Imhoof, D. M.1. "Munich 1972: Tragedy, Terror, And Triumph At The Olympic Games." Choice: Current Reviews For Academic Libraries 50.3 (2012): 560-561. Choice Reviews Online. Web. 20 Feb. 2014.

This book will be shelved at HV 6433 G32 L37 2012 with other books on crime once it is not a "New book".

Ask a librarian to help you find this or other books.

See our previous Books of the Week here.



LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: The Queen of Katwe

Cover of ''The Queen of Katwe''

The Queen of Katwe: A Story of Life, Chess, and One Extraordinary Girl’s Dream of Becoming a Grandmaster by Tim Crothers

"It's a story almost too uplifting to believe: a young girl from a dirt-poor slum in Uganda meets a man, a missionary from a similar background, who inspires her to take up chess, a game so unknown in her country that there is not even a word for it in her language. The girl rises to national champion and travels to the Chess Olympiad in Siberia, a journey that opens her eyes to a world she might never have known.

Crothers tells Phiona Mutesi's story in a crisp, reportorial style (he's a former senior writer at Sports Illustrated), but it's nearly impossible to read the book without a strong emotional response. The author necessarily talks about the social and economic challenges that Phiona encountered in Uganda—most girls her age had no bigger dreams than simply surviving—but his focus remains centered on Phiona herself, the uneducated prodigy, the barely literate girl who, against all odds, stands poised to become a chess grand master. Inspiring without being strident about it."

Pitt, David. "The Queen Of Katwe: A Story Of Life, Chess, And One Extraordinary Girl's Dream Of Becoming A Grandmaster." Booklist 109.4 (2012): 11-1. Library & Information Science Source. Web. 18 Feb. 2014.

This book will be shelved at GV1439 .M87 C76 2012 with other books on chess once it is not a "New book".

Ask a librarian to help you find this or other books.

See our previous Books of the Week here.



LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: The Year Without Summer

Cover of ''The Year Without Summer''

The Year Without Summer: 1816 and the Volcano that Darkened the World and Changed History by William K. Klingaman and Nicholas P. Klingaman

"...a sweeping history of the year that became known as 18-hundred-and-froze-to-death. 1816 was a remarkable year—mostly for the fact that there was no summer. As a result of a volcanic eruption in Indonesia, weather patterns were disrupted worldwide for months, allowing for excessive rain, frost, and snowfall through much of the Northeastern U.S. and Europe in the summer of 1816.

In the U.S., the extraordinary weather produced food shortages, religious revivals, and extensive migration from New England to the Midwest. In Europe, the cold and wet summer led to famine, food riots, the transformation of stable communities into wandering beggars, and one of the worst typhus epidemics in history. 1816 was the year Frankenstein was written. It was also the year Turner painted his fiery sunsets. All of these things are linked to global climate change—something we are quite aware of now, but that was utterly mysterious to people in the nineteenth century, who concocted all sorts of reasons for such an ungenial season.

Making use of a wealth of source material and employing a compelling narrative approach featuring peasants and royalty, politicians, writers, and scientists, The Year Without Summer examines not only the climate change engendered by this event, but also its effects on politics, the economy, the arts, and social structures."

Amazon.com summary

This book will be shelved at at QB 523 T285 K55 2013 with other books on volcanoes.

Ask a librarian to help you find resources on this or related books.

See our previous Books of the Week here.



Off-Campus Database Access Restored!

Just in time for another snowfall. We're very sorry for the inconvenience.



LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: Love: A History

Cover of ''Love: A History''

Love: A History by Simon May

"Love—unconditional, selfless, unchanging, sincere, and totally accepting—is worshipped today as the West's only universal religion. To challenge it is one of our few remaining taboos. In this pathbreaking and superbly written book, philosopher Simon May does just that, dissecting our resilient ruling ideas of love and showing how they are the product of a long and powerful cultural heritage."

—from the Publishers Website

This is an ebook! You can print chapters, download it to a reader,or read it online. Start by looking it up in the library's catalog. Ask a librarian if you need help.

Other books about love are located in the stacks in various locations depending on their focus. Try HQ 801 for books about relationships. Ask a librarian to help you find the type of books you want!

See our previous Books of the Week here.



LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: True Stories of Becoming a Nurse

Cover of ''I Wasn’t Stong Like This When I Started Out: True Stories of Becoming a Nurse''

I Wasn’t Stong Like This When I Started Out: True Stories of Becoming a Nurse Edited by Lee Gutkind

"This collection of true narratives reflects the dynamism and diversity of nurses, who provide the first vital line of patient care. Here, nurses remember their first "sticks," first births, and first deaths, and reflect on what gets them though long, demanding shifts, and keeps them in the profession.

The stories reveal many voices from nurses at different stages of their careers: One nurse-in-training longs to be trusted with more "important" procedures, while another questions her ability to care for nursing home residents. An efficient young emergency room nurse finds his life and career irrevocably changed by a car accident. A nurse practitioner wonders whether she has violated professional boundaries in her care for a homeless man with AIDS, and a home care case manager is the sole attendee at a funeral for one of her patients. What connects these stories is the passion and strength of the writers, who struggle against burnout and bureaucracy to serve their patients with skill, empathy, and strength."

Amazon.com

This book will be shelved at at RT 34 I2 2013 with other books on nursing.

Ask a librarian to help you find resources on this or related topics.

See our previous Books of the Week here.



LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: A Quiet Revolution: The Veil’s Resurgence…

Cover of ''A Quiet Revolution: The Veil's Resurgence, From the Middle East to America''

A Quiet Revolution: The Veil's Resurgence, From the Middle East to America by Leila Ahmed

"Prominent feminist scholar Ahmed (Harvard) explores a subject that has reportedly puzzled her for many decades: the resurgence of Muslim head coverings in both Muslim majority societies and minority contexts. The topic has generated much public debate and countless publications, to which Ahmed adds her thoughtful perspective. Her critical historiography of "the veil" spans the 20th century, taking readers from its virtual disappearance in the 1920s to the 1950s to its reemergence with, as she argues, new and diverse meanings from the 1970s to the first decade of the 21st century.

Ahmed deftly combines historical documents and existing empirical studies of veiling practices, discourses, and attitudes with her own memories, reflections, and fieldwork in the American context. Shifting the geographical focus from Egypt to the US in the latter part of the book, she argues for a close connection between veiling and the global spread of Islamism as an ideology and form of Islam."

Hammer, J. "A Quiet Revolution: The Veil's Resurgence, From The Middle East To America." Choice: Current Reviews For Academic Libraries 49.10 (2012): 1890. Web. 23 Jan. 2014.

This book will be shelved at at BP190.5 .H44 A46 2011 with other books on Islam , when it is no longer a new book.

Ask a librarian to help you find resources on this or related topics.

See our previous Books of the Week here.



LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: The King Years Trilogy

Cover of ''The King Years Trilogy''

The King Years Trilogy by Taylor Branch

"One of the greatest of American stories has found its great chronicler in Taylor Branch. Beginning with Parting the Waters in 1988, followed 10 years later by Pillar of Fire, and closing now with At Canaan's Edge, Branch has given the short life of Martin Luther King Jr. and the nonviolent revolution he led the epic treatment they deserve. The three books of Branch's America in the King Years trilogy are lyrical and dramatic, social history as much as biography, woven from the ever more complex strands of King's movement, with portraits of figures like Lyndon Johnson, Bob Moses, J. Edgar Hoover, and Diane Nash as compelling as that of his central character.

...

Branch knows that you can't tell King's story without following these many threads, and he spends nearly as much time in Johnson's war councils as he does in the equally fractious meetings of King's Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Branch's knotty, allusive style can be challenging, but it vividly evokes the density of those days and the countless demands on King's manic stoicism."

Tom Nissley, Amazon.com Review

This book will be shelved at at E 185.61 with other books on African American history.

Ask a librarian to help you find resources on this or related books.

See our previous Books of the Week here.



LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: Color: American Photography Transformed

Cover of ''Color: American Photography Transformed''

Color: American Photography Transformed by the Amon Carter Museum of American Art (John Rohrbach; essay by Sylvie Pénichon)

"The first book that addresses color in photography from the beginning of the medium to the present, this landmark copublication with the Amon Carter Museum of American Art explores how color transformed photography into today's dominant artistic form."

from the publisher’s website

Also see the Amon Carter Museum's website: http://www.cartermuseum.org/exhibitions/color-american-photography-transformed

This book will be shelved at at TR510 .C536 2013 with other oversize books on photography (next to the computer lab), when it is no longer a new book.

Ask a librarian to help you find resources on this or related topics.

See our previous Books of the Week here.