Looking for a good read? Try a Book of the Week!

Library Blog

Library Closed August 7-23

The Library will be closed August 7-23 for renovation work.

During this time, books may be returned to E111. Books requested from other CUNY schools can also be picked up in E111.

If you need research help, you can email us or use the Research Chat button on every page of our site.

You can also request books from other CUNY schools using your LaGuardia student ID. That same ID will let you use any CUNY library.

We're very sorry for the inconvenience! We'll see everyone back in the Library August 24!



LaGuardia Library Book(s) of the Week: Recent Leisure Reading

photo of a relaxing beach

The library has a Leisure Reading collection which includes these books and many more. It's right behind our magazine/newspaper section. Ask a librarian about it!

cover of ''Rock with Wings'' cover of ''Day Shift'' cover of ''Beauty's Kingdom''

cover of ''An Ember in the Ashes'' cover of ''Rock with Wings'' cover of ''Memory Man''

See our previous Books of the Week here.



Renewing a New York Times Academic Pass

A year has gone by since LaGuardians first began signing up for their free New York Times Academic passes. As those passes reach the end of the first year, the article counter will begin again for each individual pass-holder. After accessing 10 articles users will be prompted to subscribe or log-in. LaGuardia patrons should go to nytimes.com/passes and sign in as an existing subscriber. Pass holders should also receive an email from the New York Times with renewal instructions.

And if you have never signed up, follow the instruction below to take advantage of this valuable resource:

1. Go to nytimes.com/passes.

2. Click on "Register" and create a NYTimes.com account using your school email address.

3. At the bottom of the welcome page, click "Continue".

4. You will then see a message directing you to check your CUNY e-mail. The message should arrive in your inbox within 15 minutes. Click on the link provided to confirm your e-mail address.

5. Once confirmed it will simultaneously verify your eligibility and grant your Academic Pass.



LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: Under This Beautiful Dome

cover of ''Under This Beautiful Dome: A Senator, a Journalist, and the Politics of Gay Love in America''

Under This Beautiful Dome: A Senator, a Journalist, and the Politics of Gay Love in America by Terry Mutchler

"Mutchler was the newly appointed Associated Press bureau chief in Springfield when she met Illinois State Senator Penny Severns, who had been a mentor to Barack Obama during his time in the state legislature and had a promising career of her own. Despite the risk to Severns’ career and image, and worries about the ethical breaches for Mutchler, the two fell in love and began a five-year relationship, including a surreptitious and unofficial marriage. It was the 1990s in a conservative political town. At great emotional and psychological costs, they developed very elaborate schedules to hide their union, lying to friends, family, and colleagues, making secret rendezvous when they were both in the capital. Their lives became infinitely more complicated when Severns was diagnosed with breast cancer. Her twin had had a bout with cancer, and another sister had died of the disease. Severns' death forced Mutchler to confront the cruel limits on the rights of gay couples. This is a heartbreaking story of love and politics, a timely read with changes occurring across the nation in gay-marriage rights."

Bush, Vanessa. "Under this Beautiful Dome: A Senator, a Journalist, and the Politics of Gay Love in America." Booklist 111.6 (2014): 6. Academic Search Complete. Web. 28 Apr. 2015.

This book is in the New Books area in front of the Reference Desk. Books not here in the Library can be requsted from storage (it only takes a day or so...). Instructions on how to request books are here.

Ask a librarian to help you find this or other books.

See our previous Books of the Week here.



Today: ILLiad and CLICS

Need articles or books that the library doesn't own? Use ILLiad or CLICS!

In this workshop, participants will learn how to register for an ILLiad account and use the feature in library subscription databases to request articles via the Interlibrary Loan Service. Participants will also learn how to retrieve articles sent electronically to email accounts and how to create requests within ILLiad.

Candy! Highlighters! A raffle!

To request books from other CUNY libraries, attendees will have hands-on experience using the CLICS feature within the CUNY Catalog to submit requests. Please Note: Before the workshop, participants must register the barcode on their CUNY I. D. Card at the Library's Circulation Desk to use ILLiad and CLICS.

OPEN TO ALL LAGUARDIA STUDENTS, FACULTY AND STAFF!

  • When: Thursday, May 28, 2015
  • Time: 3:00 – 4:30 P.M.
  • Where: Library Classroom (E101-B)
  • Facilitators: Prof. Clementine Lewis and Mr. Christopher McHale

For additional information, please contact Prof. Catherine Stern [castern@lagcc.cuny.edu, x6021] or Prof. Alexandra Rojas [arojas@lagcc.cuny.edu, x6020].



LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: The Underground Girls of Kabul

Cover of ''The Underground Girls of Kabul: In Search of a Hidden Resistance in Afghanistan''

The Underground Girls of Kabul: In Search of a Hidden Resistance in Afghanistan by by Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn

"Set against the violent backdrop of America's longest war, The Underground Girls of Kabul follows Afghan girls who live disguised as boys through childhood and puberty, only to be expected by adult age to transform into subordinate wives and mothers. But the battle of nature versus nurture lingers, and some bacha posh will refuse to rescind their male prerogatives in what the UN calls the world’s most dangerous country to be a woman.

The book is anchored by vivid female characters who bring this ancient phenomenon to life: Azita, a female parliamentarian whose youngest daughter is chosen to pose as her only son; Zahra, the tomboy teenager who struggles with puberty and resists her parents’ attempts to turn her into a woman; Shukria, who was forced to marry and have three children after living for twenty years as a man; and Shahed, an Afghan special forces soldier, still in disguise as an adult man.

Offering a new and original story about Afghanistan and its women, The Underground Girls of Kabul investigates the hidden practice of bacha posh that has affected generations, while examining its parallels to our own history. The act of reaching for more freedom by impersonating a man is one that can be recognized by women everywhere."

from the website for the book

This book is in New Books (by the Reference Desk). Don't forget you can also request books from storage. Instructions on how to request books are here.

Ask a librarian to help you find resources on this or related books.



LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: A Path Appears

Cover of ''A Path Appears: Transforming Lives, Creating Opportunity''

A Path Appears: Transforming Lives, Creating Opportunity by by Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn

"An eye-opening account of the "unmatched ecological appetite" behind Coca-Cola's worldwide success. In this deeply informed debut, Elmore (History/Univ. of Alabama) details the outsourcing strategy that he calls "Coca-Cola Capitalism," which has allowed Coke to become the world's top brand, with operations in more than 200 countries, at a huge cost to the environment and human health. Acknowledging the company's marketing genius, Elmore claims that Coke's real secret formula has been to rely on other people's time and money, often using public infrastructure to extract raw materials and transport finished products. The strategy—first developed by mass marketers at the turn of the 20th century and later imitated by McDonald's, large software firms and other corporations--eliminates upfront costs and risky investments. Since its founding in 1886, Coke has relied on partnerships for the sugar, caffeine, water, cans and bottles, and other raw materials needed to create its beverages (now selling more than 1.8 billion servings per day……Without a doubt, Coke has been a good public citizen that stimulates economies and improves lives, writes the author, but the costs to taxpayers--for recycling systems, public pipes and subsidized farms--and the environment call into question how such unsustainable practices can continue in an age of scarcity."

"CITIZEN COKE." Kirkus Reviews LXXXII.19 (2014). ProQuest Social Science Journals. Web. 26 Mar. 2015.

This book is in Leisure Reading under K. Don't forget you can also request books from storage. Instructions on how to request books are here.

Ask a librarian to help you find resources on this or related books.

See our previous Books of the Week here.



LaGuardia Library Book/eBook of the Week: What Unions No Longer Do

cover of ''What Unions No Longer Do''

What Unions No Longer Do by Jake Rosenfeld

"From workers' wages to presidential elections, labor unions once exerted tremendous clout in American life. In the immediate post-World War II era, one in three workers belonged to a union. The fraction now is close to one in ten, and just one in twenty in the private sector—the lowest in a century. The only thing big about Big Labor today is the scope of its problems. While many studies have attempted to explain the causes of this decline, What Unions No Longer Do lays bare the broad repercussions of labor's collapse for the American economy and polity.

Organized labor was not just a minor player during the "golden age" of welfare capitalism in the middle decades of the twentieth century, Jake Rosenfeld asserts. Rather, for generations it was the core institution fighting for economic and political equality in the United States. Unions leveraged their bargaining power to deliver tangible benefits to workers while shaping cultural understandings of fairness in the workplace. The labor movement helped sustain an unprecedented period of prosperity among America’s expanding, increasingly multiethnic middle class.

What Unions No Longer Do shows in detail the consequences of labor’s decline: curtailed advocacy for better working conditions, weakened support for immigrants' economic assimilation, and ineffectiveness in addressing wage stagnation among African-Americans. In short, unions are no longer instrumental in combating inequality in our economy and our politics, and the result is a sharp decline in the prospects of American workers and their families."

from the publisher’s website

This book is in the New Books area in front of the Reference Desk. It is also available as an electronic book. Physical books not here in the Library can be requsted from storage (it only takes a day or so...). Instructions on how to request books are here.

Ask a librarian to help you find this or other books.

See our previous Books of the Week here.



LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: Spare Parts: Four Undocumented Teenagers…

cover of ''Spare Parts: Four Undocumented Teenagers, One Ugly Robot, and the Battle for the American Dream''

Spare Parts: Four Undocumented Teenagers, One Ugly Robot, and the Battle for the American Dream by Joshua Davis

"Davis offers a forceful portrait of four Mexican American teens from an impoverished neighborhood in Phoenix who became engineers and won first place in a national NASA-sponsored robotics competition. Despite their meager funds and lack of experience, these high school students, with the support of two teachers, succeed beyond all expectations, defeating well-funded teams like the one from MIT.

Throughout the book, Davis gives almost equal time to the rising tide of anti-immigrant feeling in Arizona and around the nation. These young men, all but one of who are undocumented, are painfully aware that their place in the spotlight may garner unwanted scrutiny by immigration officials. Despite their amazing win, their options continue to be severely constrained. The final chapters, which document what happened after the accolades and fanfare faded, really capture the character of these young men.

Davis takes what could have been another feelgood story of triumphant underdogs and raises the stakes by examining the difficulties of these young immigrants in the context of the societal systems that they briefly and temporarily overcame."

"Spare Parts: Four Mexican American Teenagers, One Ugly Robot, and the Battle for the American Dream." Publishers Weekly 261.40 (2014): 55. Academic Search Complete. Web. 2 Apr. 2015.

This book is in our Leisure Reading section, filed under D. Books not here in the Library can be requsted from storage (it only takes a day or so...). Instructions on how to request books are here.

Ask a librarian to help you find this or other books.

See our previous Books of the Week here.



LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: The Quantum Moment

cover of ''The Quantum Moment: How Planck, Bohr, Einstein, and Heisenberg Taught Us to Love Uncertainty''

The Quantum Moment: How Planck, Bohr, Einstein, and Heisenberg Taught Us to Love Uncertainty by Robert P. Crease and Alfred Scharff Goldhaber

"...Robert P. Crease and Alfred Scharff Goldhaber...draw on their training and six years of co-teaching to dramatize the quantum's rocky path from scientific theory to public understanding. Together, they and their students explored missteps and mistranslations, jokes and gibberish, of public discussion about the quantum. Their book explores the quantum’s manifestations in everything from art and sculpture to the prose of John Updike and David Foster Wallace. The authors reveal the quantum's implications for knowledge, metaphor, intellectual exchange, and the contemporary world. Understanding and appreciating quantum language and imagery, and recognizing its misuse, is part of what it means to be an educated person today.

The result is a celebration of language at the interface of physics and culture, perfect for anyone drawn to the infinite variety of ideas.

from the publisher's website

This book is in the New Books area in front of the Reference Desk. Books not here in the Library can be requsted from storage (it only takes a day or so...). Instructions on how to request books are here.

Ask a librarian to help you find this or other books.

See our previous Books of the Week here.



LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: The Test: Why Our Schools are Obsessed with Standardized Testing

cover of ''The Test: Why Our Schools are Obsessed with Standardized Testing – But You Don't Have to Be''

The Test: Why Our Schools are Obsessed with Standardized Testing – But You Don't Have to Be by Anya Kamenetz

"Thorough research and illuminating interviews... With abundant data assembled in an accessible format, the book is a must-read for anyone in the educational system or any parent who has a child old enough to enter preschool… An informative and enlightening appraisal of the regimented tests that American schoolchildren of all ages are subjected to taking on a regular basis."—Kirkus Reviews

"The value of Anya Kamenetz's new book, The Test, lies in her ability to avoid the soapbox style of too many books on education reform today. Her journalistic talents coupled with her role as a mother of a student on the brink of testing humanizes this book, making it a perfect entry for parents who are too deep in the muck of testing to have the clarity of distance."—Boston Globe

—Review excerpts from Kamenetz's website

This book is in our Leisure Reading section, filed under K. Don't forget: books not here in the Library can be requsted from storage (it only takes a day or so...). Instructions on how to request books are here.

Ask a librarian to help you find this or other books.

See our previous Books of the Week here.



LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: America’s Bitter Pill

cover of ''America's Bitter Pill: Money, Politics, Backroom Deals, and the Fight to Fix our Broken Healthcare System''

America's Bitter Pill: Money, Politics, Backroom Deals, and the Fight to Fix our Broken Healthcare System by Steven Brill

"In 2009 and 2010, the Obama administration waged a very public fight to pass a bill to overhaul America’s health-care system.

Its goals, on paper, were admirable: universal coverage, no more targeting for preexisting conditions, and depending on who you asked, curbing costs.

Unfortunately for the administration, and the Democratic Party, health-care reform would devolve into a narrative about a morally questionable legislative process, a midterm election anchor, and a botched implementation.

In a sweeping and spirited new book, America's Bitter Pill, journalist Steven Brill chronicles the surprisingly juicy tale of reform. Brill, whose Time cover story last spring about costs of care caused quite a stir, has focused an unsparing eye on a countless number of politicians, bureaucrats, lobbyists, activists, and industry types. The result is an exacting and always readable examination of how a good idea turned sour, how the public got screwed, and who is to blame."

O'Connor, William. "Steven Brill Explains Why the Obamacare Band-Aid Is so Pathetic." The Daily Beast. Newsweek/Daily Beast, 14 Jan. 2015. Web. 26 Mar. 2015.

This book is in our Leisure Reading section, filed under B. Don't forget: books not here in the Library can be requsted from storage (it only takes a day or so...). Instructions on how to request books are here.

Ask a librarian to help you find this or other books.

See our previous Books of the Week here.



LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: Sally Ride: America’s First Woman in Space

cover of ''Sally Ride: America's First Woman in Space''

Sally Ride: America's First Woman in Space by Lynn Sherr

"An award-winning journalist's revealing biography of Sally Ride (1951-2012), the first American woman in space. ...Sherr...first met Ride, a young Stanford-trained physicist, in 1981. Three years earlier, NASA had chosen Ride to join a group of five other women and 29 men to participate in the new space shuttle program. The group represented the very best minds America had to offer. But for the women, who were the first in NASA history to be selected for space flight, the challenge was even greater. They not only represented themselves as individuals, but their entire gender. As the first woman to actually go on a mission, Ride came under especially intense scrutiny from the media. Her ability to lead but also 'take orders like a trooper,' along with her wit and charm, endeared her to America and the world.

During the nine years she was associated with the space program, Ride's exemplary conduct 'transformed female astronauts from a punch line into a matter of national pride.' She returned to academia afterward and became a professor. Eager to use her notoriety to help young people, and especially girls, take an interest in math and science, she co-founded Sally Ride Science in 2001. However, the former astronaut was never entirely comfortable with her celebrity status and kept parts of her life hidden, including the fact that she was a lesbian. Though married during her years at NASA, Ride's true sexual orientation did not become public until her death, when her obituary mentioned that she had been survived by a female partner of nearly three decades. Sherr's book is important not simply because it memorializes an American icon. It pointedly reminds readers of the crippling burden of 'shame and fear' that even—and perhaps especially—the most golden heroes must bear in societies that cannot tolerate difference."

Sally Ride: America's First Woman in Space." Kirkus Reviews 82.8 (2014): 46. Library & Information Science Source. Web. 17 Mar. 2015.

This book is in the New Books area in front of the Reference Desk. Books not here in the Library can be requsted from storage (it only takes a day or so...). Instructions on how to request books are here.

Ask a librarian to help you find this or other books.

See our previous Books of the Week here.



LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: Men Explain Things To Me

cover of ''Men Explain Things To Me''

Men Explain Things To Me by Rebecca Solnit

"In her comic, scathing essay "Men Explain Things to Me," Rebecca Solnit takes on what often goes wrong in conversations between men and women. She writes about men who wrongly assume they know things and wrongly assume women don’t, about why this arises, and how this aspect of the gender wars works, airing some of her own hilariously awful encounters.

She ends on a serious note—because the ultimate problem is the silencing of women who have something to say, including those saying things like, "He’s trying to kill me!"

The updated edition of this national bestseller features two new essays, including Solnit's recent essay on the remarkable feminist conversation that arose in the wake of the 2014 Isla Vista killings."

from the publisher's website

You can request books from storage (it only takes a day or so...). Instructions on how to request books are here.

Ask a librarian to help you find this or other books.

See our previous Books of the Week here.



LaGuardia Library eBook of the Week: Ain’t Scared of Your Jail

cover of ''Ain't Scared of Your Jail: Arrest, Imprisonment, and the Civil Rights Movement''

Ain't Scared of Your Jail: Arrest, Imprisonment, and the Civil Rights Movement by Zoey A. Colley

"Imprisonment became a badge of honor for many protestors during the civil rights movement. With the popularization of expressions such as "jail-no-bail" and "jail-in," civil rights activists sought to transform arrest and imprisonment from something to be feared to a platform for the cause. Beyond Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s "Letters from the Birmingham Jail," there has been little discussion on the incarceration experiences of civil rights activists. In her debut book, Zoe Colley does what no historian has done before by following civil rights activists inside the southern jails and prisons to explore their treatment and the different responses that civil rights organizations had to mass arrest and imprisonment.

Colley focuses on the shift in philosophical and strategic responses of civil rights protestors from seeing jail as something to be avoided to seeing it as a way to further the cause. Imprisonment became a way to expose the evils of segregation, and highlighted to the rest of American society the injustice of southern racism. By drawing together the narratives of many individuals and organizations, Colley paints a clearer picture of how the incarceration of civil rights activists helped shape the course of the movement. She places imprisonment at the forefront of civil rights history and shows how these new attitudes toward arrest continue to impact contemporary society and shape strategies for civil disobedience."

from the publisher's website

This is an ebook available via the library's catalog.

Ask a librarian to help you find this or other books.

See our previous Books of the Week here.