Library Blog

LaGuardia Library Book of the Week – Unsettled

Unsettled: Cambodian Refugees in the NYC Hyperghetto by Eric Tang

Unsettled Cambodian Refugees in the NYC Hyperghetto by Eric Tang

"Scrupulous, courageous and fiercely argued, Unsettled is an ethnographic revelation. . . . Tang, a former organizer, brings to light the political ecology of a community that has survived war, genocide, and displacement and is now struggling to remake the Bronx hyperghetto, exposing in the process the ‘impossible’ condition that may be the fate of all refugee communities in the neoliberal city." —Junot Díaz, author of The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao

“After surviving the Khmer Rouge genocide, followed by years of confinement to international refugee camps, as many as 10,000 Southeast Asian refugees arrived in the Bronx during the 1980s and ‘90s. Unsettled chronicles the unfinished odyssey of Bronx Cambodians, closely following one woman and her family for several years as they survive yet resist their literal insertion into concentrated Bronx poverty.

Eric Tang tells the harrowing and inspiring stories of these refugees to make sense of how and why the displaced migrants have been resettled in the “hyperghetto.” He argues that refuge is never found, that rescue discourses mask a more profound urban reality characterized by racialized geographic enclosure, economic displacement and unrelenting poverty, and the criminalization of daily life.

Unsettled views the hyperghetto as a site of extreme isolation, punishment, and confinement. The refugees remain captives in late-capitalist urban America. Tang ultimately asks: What does it mean for these Cambodians to resettle into this distinct time and space of slavery’s afterlife?” – From the publishers website: http://www.temple.edu/tempress/titles/2333_reg.html

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LaGuardia Library Book of the Week – Saving Gotham

Saving Gotham: A Billionaire Mayor, Activist Doctors, and the Fight for Eight Million Lives by Tom Farley, M.D.

Saving Gotham: A Billionaire Mayor, Activist Doctors, and the Fight for Eight Million Lives by Tom Farley, M.D.

"“In 2002, a dynamic doctor named Thomas Frieden became health commissioner of New York City. With support from the new mayor, billionaire Michael Bloomberg, Frieden and his health department team prohibited smoking in bars, outlawed trans fats in restaurants, and attempted to cap the size of sodas, among other groundbreaking actions. The initiatives drew heated criticism, but they worked: by 2011, 450,000 people had quit smoking, childhood obesity rates were falling, and life expectancy was growing.

Saving Gotham is the behind-the-scenes story of the most controversial—and successful—public health initiative of our time. Thomas A. Farley, MD, who succeeded Frieden as health commissioner, introduces a team of doctors who accepted the challenge of public health: to care for each of New York City’s eight million inhabitants as their own patients. The biggest threats they faced were not cholera or chemical toxins or lack of medical care but instead habits like smoking and unhealthy eating. As these doctors pressed to solve these problems, they found themselves battling those who encouraged those habits, and they reshaped their own agency for a different sort of fight.

Farley shows what happens when science-driven doctors are given the political cover to make society-wide changes to protect people from today’s health risks—and how industries exploit legislatures, the courts, the media, and public opinion to undermine them. With Washington caught in partisan paralysis and New York City’s ideas spreading around the world, Saving Gotham demonstrates how government—local government—can protect its citizens and transform health for everyone.”

– From the publishers website: http://books.wwnorton.com/books/Saving-Gotham/

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LaGuardia Library Book of the Week – Just Kids from the Bronx

Just Kids from the Bronx: Telling It the Way It Was By Arlene Alda

Just Kids from the Bronx: Telling It the Way It Was By Arlene Alda

“A touching and provocative collection of memories that evoke the history of one of America's most influential boroughs-the Bronx-through some of its many success stories.

The vivid oral histories in Arlene Alda's Just Kids from the Bronx reveal what it was like to grow up in the place that bred the influencers in just about every field of endeavor. The Bronx is where Michael Kay, the New York Yankees' play-by-play broadcaster, first experienced baseball; where J. Crew's CEO Millard ("Mickey") Drexler found his ambition; where Neil deGrasse Tyson and Dava Sobel fell in love with science; and where local music making inspired singer-songwriter Dion DiMucci and hip-hop's Grandmaster Melle Mel.

The parks, the pickup games, the tough and tender mothers, the politics, the gangs, the food-for people who grew up in the Bronx, childhood recollections are fresh. Arlene Alda's own Bronx memories were a jumping-off point from which to reminisce with a nun, a police officer, an urban planner, and with Al Pacino, Carl Reiner, Colin Powell, Maira Kalman, Bobby Bonilla, Mary Higgins Clark, and many other leading artists, athletes, scientists, and entrepreneurs-experiences spanning six decades of Bronx living.”

– From the publishers website: http://us.macmillan.com/justkidsfromthebronx/arlenealda

See our previous Books of the Week here.

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LaGuardia Library Book of the Week – The Gay Revolution

LaGuardia Library Book of the Week – The Gay Revolution: The Story of the Struggle by Lillian Faderman

The Gay Revolution: The Story of the Struggle by Lillian Faderman cover

“The sweeping story of the modern struggle for gay, lesbian, and trans rights—from the 1950s to the present—based on amazing interviews with politicians, military figures, legal activists, and members of the entire LGBT community who face these challenges every day.

The fight for gay, lesbian, and trans civil rights—the years of outrageous injustice, the early battles, the heart-breaking defeats, and the victories beyond the dreams of the gay rights pioneers—is the most important civil rights issue of the present day. Based on rigorous research and more than 150 interviews, The Gay Revolution tells this unfinished story not through dry facts but through dramatic accounts of passionate struggles, with all the sweep, depth, and intricacies only an award-winning activist, scholar, and novelist like Lillian Faderman can evoke.

The Gay Revolution begins in the 1950s, when law classified gays and lesbians as criminals, the psychiatric profession saw them as mentally ill, the churches saw them as sinners, and society victimized them with irrational hatred. Against this dark backdrop, a few brave people began to fight back, paving the way for the revolutionary changes of the 1960s and beyond. Faderman discusses the protests in the 1960s; the counter reaction of the 1970s and early eighties; the decimated but united community during the AIDS epidemic; and the current hurdles for the right to marriage equality.

In the words of the eyewitnesses who were there through the most critical events, The Gay Revolution paints a nuanced portrait of the LGBT civil rights movement.” -– – From the publisher’s website: http://books.simonandschuster.com/

See our previous Books of the Week here.

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LaGuardia Library Book of the Week – Wedlocked

Wedlocked: The Perils of Marriage Equality - How African-Americans and Gays Mistakenly Thought the Right to Marry Would Set Them Free - By Katherine Franke

 Wedlocked The Perils of Marriage Equality By Katherine Franke

“The staggering string of victories by the gay rights movement’s campaign for marriage equality raises questions not only about how gay people have been able to successfully deploy marriage to elevate their social and legal reputation, but also what kind of freedom and equality the ability to marry can mobilize.

Wedlocked turns to history to compare today’s same-sex marriage movement to the experiences of newly emancipated black people in the mid-nineteenth century, when they were able to legally marry for the first time.”

“Wedlocked is a brilliantly conceived cautionary tale of the risks of securing a ‘freedom to marry.’ Drawing upon original research into the complications that marriage rights carried for slaves freed in the 1860s, Katherine Franke warns that marriage rights are not the unalloyed triumph for gay people and same-sex couples that the Supreme Court and virtually all commentators have claimed. Anyone interested in gay marriage should read this book—but so should anyone concerned about the stubborn perseverance of racism in America. For those who appreciate irony, compare this fascinating book with Justice Thomas’s skeptical dissent in the recent marriage equality cases.”-William N. Eskridge Jr.,author of Dishonorable Passions: Sodomy Laws in America, 1861-2003

– From the publishers website: http://nyupress.org

See our previous Books of the Week here.

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LaGuardia Library Book of the Week – The Defender: How the Legendary Black Newspaper

BOOK OF THE WEEK

The Defender: How the Legendary Black Newspaper Changed America

The Defender: How the Legendary Black Newspaper Changed America by Ethan Michaeli

“Without the Chicago Defender, there would be no Great Migration. There would be no presidents John F. Kennedy, Harry S. Truman, or Barack Obama. In fact, without the Chicago Defender, there would be no Chicago. At least not one we’d recognize.

If those claims sound hyperbolic, read The Defender: How the Legendary Black Newspaper Changed America, Ethan Michaeli’s captivating account of the Chicago Defender’s history and its undeniable impact—physical, social, and political—on the United States. From its genesis at the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition to its post-war heyday and eventual decline, Michaeli’s painstakingly researched narrative isn’t just the story of a newspaper, nor of a single African-American community, but the story of the entire city, country, and century.”

(Morgan, Adam. "Ethan Michaeli’s The Defender Will Change the Way You See Chicago." Chicago Review of Books. N.p., 01 Feb. 2016. Web. 02 June 2016.)

To find other books on related topics try searching the catalog for: (media or newspapers or press or journalism) AND (history or activism)

This is just one way you can look for related information-Ask a librarian for help with keywords, narrowing your search or other types of information that may be useful!

Don't forget that you can also request books from storage! Instructions on how to do that are here. It takes about a day for books to come out of storage.

Ask a librarian to help you find resources on this or related books.

See our previous Books of the Week here.



LaGuardia Library Book of the Week – This is an Uprising

LaGuardia Library Book of the Week – This is an Uprising: How Nonviolent Revolt is Shaping the Twenty-First Century by Mark Engler and Paul Engler

This is an Uprising: How Nonviolent Revolt is Shaping the Twenty-First Century by Mark Engler and Paul Engler cover

“From protests around climate change and immigrant rights, to Occupy, the Arab Spring, and #BlackLivesMatter, a new generation is unleashing strategic nonviolent action to shape public debate and force political change. When mass movements erupt onto our television screens, the media consistently portrays them as being spontaneous and unpredictable. Yet, in this book, Mark and Paul Engler look at the hidden art behind such outbursts of protest, examining core principles that have been used to spark and guide moments of transformative unrest.

With incisive insights from contemporary activists, as well as fresh revelations about the work of groundbreaking figures such as Gandhi, Martin Luther King Jr., Gene Sharp, and Frances Fox Piven, the Englers show how people with few resources and little conventional influence are engineering the upheavals that are reshaping contemporary politics.

Nonviolence is usually seen simply as a philosophy or moral code. This Is an Uprising shows how it can instead be deployed as a method of political conflict, disruption, and escalation. It argues that if we are always taken by surprise by dramatic outbreaks of revolt, we pass up the chance to understand a critical phenomenon—and to harness its power to create lasting change”. -– From the website for the book: http://thisisanuprising.org

See our previous Books of the Week here.

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MLA/APA Help-a-thon

WHAT: It’s that time of the semester….

Bring in your questions or problem citations and meet one-on-one with a librarian for how-to advice on citing sources and formatting your research papers.

NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY!

WHEN: Drop in anytime during any of these two hour sessions:

• Tuesday, May 17th 2-4 PM

• Thursday, May 26th 12 –2 PM

• Thursday, May 26th 5-7 PM

WHERE: Library Lab (E101-B)



MLA/APA Help-a-thon



LaGuardia Library Books of the Week – Humor Month

In Celebration of Humor Month

(Okay, it was last month… did you hear the one about the tardy librarian?)

Aziz Ansari Modern Romance'' Jenny Lawson Furiously Happy'' Melissa Rivers book of Joan''

Biscuit for Your Thoughts cover ''

mindy kaling why not me' humour a short introduction cover' Moira Marsh Practically Joking cover'

Ask a librarian for assistance in finding funny stuff.

See our previous Books of the Week here.



LaGuardia Library Journals of the Week – Poetry Month

In Celebration of Poetry Month – Journals of the Week

You can find poetry through our databases and some great websites. Here are 5 highly regarded poetry journals you can access through the library:

Kenyon Review logo''
Poetry Magazine logo''


American Poetry Review logo'' Ploughshares logo''


Threepenny Review logo'

You can also search for work by particular poets in our databases.

Try Onesearch to look for work in all formats-books, newspapers, magazines, videos, and audiorecordings!

Many of our databases include poetry (JSTOR, Academic Search Complete, Humanities Source, Granger’s, etc). Ask a librarian for a recommendation.

The Poetry Foundation http://www.poetryfoundation.org (publisher of Poetry Magazine) is another great place to look for poems on particular subjects.

Ask a librarian for help with all of these tools!

See our previous Books of the Week here.



LaGuardia Library Books of the Week – Poetry Month

In Celebration of Poetry Month - Recent Poetry Acquisitions

cover of Essential Ginsberg'' cover of ''Milk and Honey''

cover of ''Stranger’s Mirror'' cover of ''Mahabharata : a modern retelling''

cover of ''Citizen : an American lyric' cover of ''How Long is the Present''

See our previous Books of the Week here.

Ask a librarian for assistance in locating poetry. We also have many poetry journals available through our databases!




TODAY: ARTstor Workshop

The Library Department presents: ARTstor Wednesday, April 13, 2016 2:15-3:15 Library, Room E101-B The more than two million ARTstor images support teaching and research in nearly every topic imaginable, including Anthropology, Art History, Fashion & Costume, Literature, Religion, Theater, World History, and much more. Meet LaGuardia’s newest librarian and ARTstor expert, Ian McDermott, who will lead this session All LaGuardians are welcome. Please tell interested students. Contact the Library Workshop Planning Committee members, Alexandra Rojas, Catherine Stern or Christopher McHale for more information.

LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: The Edge Becomes the Center

BOOK OF THE WEEK

 The Edge Becomes the Center: An Oral History of Gentrification in the Twenty-First Century by DW Gibson

by DW Gibson

The Edge Becomes the Center: An Oral History of Gentrification in the Twenty-First Century By DW Gibson

“In this impressive and multifaceted oral history, Gibson (Not Working) explores "how gentrification affects lives" by interviewing a wide range of people living and working in New York City. As the author makes his way through the gentrified and gentrifying portions of Brooklyn (Prospect-Lefferts Gardens, Bushwick, Bedford-Stuyvesant, Red Hook) and Manhattan (the Lower East Side, Chelsea, Harlem), he interviews real estate agents, contractors, landlords, renters, housing lawyers, community organizers, city government workers, architects, artists, a squatter, a drug dealer, and an investment banker, among others. Common themes include displacement, the contradictory class positions people occupy, the rising homeless population and their "criminalization," the declining stock of affordable housing due to buyouts and deregulation, the way universities (particularly NYU and Columbia) have become some of the biggest landowners in the city, the ballooning waiting list for public housing, absentee landownership, and the forces of capitalism versus democracy. Central to this work are the distinctive voices of the New Yorkers Gibson interviews, the niches they carve out for themselves, and the myriad ways they are molding, and being molded, by their neighborhoods. Gibson manages to capture a global city in flux, in grave danger of losing its diversity--and hence all that makes it special--with its focus on capital investment over the needs of its people.”

"The Edge Becomes the Center: An Oral History of Gentrification in the Twenty-First Century." Publishers Weekly. 23 Mar. 2015: 61. Academic OneFile. Web. 19 Jan. 2016.

Check Book Review Digest or Academic Search Complete for other reviews and responses to this book.

The Edge Becomes the Center: An Oral History of Gentrification in the Twenty-First Century is a New Book. New Books are in front of the Reference Desk.

Don't forget that you can also request books from storage! Instructions on how to do that are here. It takes about a day for books to come out of storage.

Ask a librarian to help you find resources on this or related books.

See our previous Books of the Week here.



Social Explorer Workshop Thursday April 7th

Social Explorer, created under the leadership of Queens College Professor Andrew Beveridge, provides quick and easy access to current and historical demographic data that may be useful for a wide variety of courses and projects. The easy-to-use web interface lets users create maps and reports to illustrate, analyze, and understand demography and social change. Sydney Beveridge, Social Explorer’s training expert, will be here at LaGuardia on Thursday, April 7th to conduct a training session. Students, faculty and staff are welcome. Thursday, April 7, 2016, 2:15- 3:15, Library room E101-B