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LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: The Big Disconnect: The Story of Technology and Loneliness

cover of ''The Big Disconnect: The Story of Technology and Loneliness''

The Big Disconnect: The Story of Technology and Loneliness by Giles Slade

"In The Big Disconnect, award-winning writer Giles Slade offers a bracing look at an America where intimacy with machines is increasingly replacing mutual human intimacy. In a sweeping overview that ranges from the late nineteenth century to the present, Slade reveals how consumer technologies changed from analgesic devices that ameliorated the loneliness of a newly urban generation in the Gilded Age to prosthetic machines that act as substitutes for companionship in contemporary America. Mining insights from neuroscience, the author delves deeply into the history of this transformation, showing why Americans use certain technologies to mediate their connections with other human beings instead of seeking out face-to-face contacts. In a final investigative section, Slade describes ways in which some people are bucking the trend by consciously including interpersonal strategies that build empathy, community, and mutual acceptance."

from the author's website

This book will be shelved at at T 14.5 S577 with other books on technology once it is not a new book.

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See our previous Books of the Week here.



LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: The DREAMers

cover of ''The DREAMers: How the Undocumented Youth Movement Transformed the Immigrant Rights Debate''

The DREAMers: How the Undocumented Youth Movement Transformed the Immigrant Rights Debate by Walter J. Nicholls

"The DREAMers provides the first investigation of the youth movement that has transformed the national immigration debate, from its start in the early 2000s through the present day. Walter Nicholls draws on interviews, news stories, and firsthand encounters with activists to highlight the strategies and claims that have created this now-powerful voice in American politics. Facing high levels of anti-immigrant sentiment across the country, undocumented youths sought to increase support for their cause and change the terms of debate by arguing for their unique position—as culturally integrated, long term residents and most importantly as "American" youth sharing in core American values.

Since 2010 undocumented activists have increasingly claimed their own space in the public sphere, asserting a right to recognition—a right to have rights. Ultimately, through the story of the undocumented youth movement, The DREAMers shows how a stigmatized group—whether immigrants or others—can gain a powerful voice in American political debate."

from the publisher’s website

This book will be shelved at at JV6477 .N53 2013 with other books on immigration once it is not a new book.

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See our previous Books of the Week here.



LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: That’s So Gay! Microaggressions and the LGBT Community

cover of ''That’s So Gay! Microaggressions and the Lesiban, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Community''

That’s So Gay! Microaggressions and the Lesiban, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Community by Kevin Nadal

"While overt forms of discrimination and violence toward lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people have been well documented, members of this community, throughout their lives are also subject to a host of microaggressions. Although more subtle, these "smaller" forms and acts of discrimination can have cumulative negative effects on physical and mental health. That’s So Gay! reviews the history of discrimination toward LGBT people and shows how microaggressions manifest in families, the workplace, health care stings, the media, school systems, and society at large.

—from the book jacket

Dr. Nadal is a psychology professor at John Jay.

This book will be shelved at at HQ 73 N24 2013 with other books on sexuality once it is not a new book.

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See our previous Books of the Week here.



Maya Angelou Remembered

Photo of Maya Angelou and cover of ''I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings''

Maya Angelou, who passed away last week, first reached a large audience with the publication of her autobiography I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings.

In Newsweek’s original review, the reviewer wrote:

"Her autobiography regularly throws out rich, dazzling images which delight and surprise with their simplicity: a call of nature in church (“…a green persimmon, or it could have been a lemon, caught me between the legs and squeezed”), cold cathead biscuits that "sat down on themselves with the conclusiveness of a fat woman sitting in an easy chair," and many other usually unnoticed incidents of daily life.

But Miss Angelou’s book is more than a tour de force of language or the story of childhood suffering: it quietly and gracefully portrays and pays tribute to the courage, dignity and endurance of the small, rural Southern black community in which she spent most of her early years in the 1930s."

For the complete review see http://www.newsweek.com/newsweeks-original-review-i-know-why-caged-bird-sings-252587

Books by and about Maya Angelou are found at PS 3551 .N464.

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See our previous Books of the Week here.