Library Blog

LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: America’s Bitter Pill

cover of ''America's Bitter Pill: Money, Politics, Backroom Deals, and the Fight to Fix our Broken Healthcare System''

America's Bitter Pill: Money, Politics, Backroom Deals, and the Fight to Fix our Broken Healthcare System by Steven Brill

"In 2009 and 2010, the Obama administration waged a very public fight to pass a bill to overhaul America’s health-care system.

Its goals, on paper, were admirable: universal coverage, no more targeting for preexisting conditions, and depending on who you asked, curbing costs.

Unfortunately for the administration, and the Democratic Party, health-care reform would devolve into a narrative about a morally questionable legislative process, a midterm election anchor, and a botched implementation.

In a sweeping and spirited new book, America's Bitter Pill, journalist Steven Brill chronicles the surprisingly juicy tale of reform. Brill, whose Time cover story last spring about costs of care caused quite a stir, has focused an unsparing eye on a countless number of politicians, bureaucrats, lobbyists, activists, and industry types. The result is an exacting and always readable examination of how a good idea turned sour, how the public got screwed, and who is to blame."

O'Connor, William. "Steven Brill Explains Why the Obamacare Band-Aid Is so Pathetic." The Daily Beast. Newsweek/Daily Beast, 14 Jan. 2015. Web. 26 Mar. 2015.

This book is in our Leisure Reading section, filed under B. Don't forget: books not here in the Library can be requsted from storage (it only takes a day or so...). Instructions on how to request books are here.

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See our previous Books of the Week here.



LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: Sally Ride: America’s First Woman in Space

cover of ''Sally Ride: America's First Woman in Space''

Sally Ride: America's First Woman in Space by Lynn Sherr

"An award-winning journalist's revealing biography of Sally Ride (1951-2012), the first American woman in space. ...Sherr...first met Ride, a young Stanford-trained physicist, in 1981. Three years earlier, NASA had chosen Ride to join a group of five other women and 29 men to participate in the new space shuttle program. The group represented the very best minds America had to offer. But for the women, who were the first in NASA history to be selected for space flight, the challenge was even greater. They not only represented themselves as individuals, but their entire gender. As the first woman to actually go on a mission, Ride came under especially intense scrutiny from the media. Her ability to lead but also 'take orders like a trooper,' along with her wit and charm, endeared her to America and the world.

During the nine years she was associated with the space program, Ride's exemplary conduct 'transformed female astronauts from a punch line into a matter of national pride.' She returned to academia afterward and became a professor. Eager to use her notoriety to help young people, and especially girls, take an interest in math and science, she co-founded Sally Ride Science in 2001. However, the former astronaut was never entirely comfortable with her celebrity status and kept parts of her life hidden, including the fact that she was a lesbian. Though married during her years at NASA, Ride's true sexual orientation did not become public until her death, when her obituary mentioned that she had been survived by a female partner of nearly three decades. Sherr's book is important not simply because it memorializes an American icon. It pointedly reminds readers of the crippling burden of 'shame and fear' that even—and perhaps especially—the most golden heroes must bear in societies that cannot tolerate difference."

Sally Ride: America's First Woman in Space." Kirkus Reviews 82.8 (2014): 46. Library & Information Science Source. Web. 17 Mar. 2015.

This book is in the New Books area in front of the Reference Desk. Books not here in the Library can be requsted from storage (it only takes a day or so...). Instructions on how to request books are here.

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See our previous Books of the Week here.



LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: Men Explain Things To Me

cover of ''Men Explain Things To Me''

Men Explain Things To Me by Rebecca Solnit

"In her comic, scathing essay "Men Explain Things to Me," Rebecca Solnit takes on what often goes wrong in conversations between men and women. She writes about men who wrongly assume they know things and wrongly assume women don’t, about why this arises, and how this aspect of the gender wars works, airing some of her own hilariously awful encounters.

She ends on a serious note—because the ultimate problem is the silencing of women who have something to say, including those saying things like, "He’s trying to kill me!"

The updated edition of this national bestseller features two new essays, including Solnit's recent essay on the remarkable feminist conversation that arose in the wake of the 2014 Isla Vista killings."

from the publisher's website

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LaGuardia Library eBook of the Week: Ain’t Scared of Your Jail

cover of ''Ain't Scared of Your Jail: Arrest, Imprisonment, and the Civil Rights Movement''

Ain't Scared of Your Jail: Arrest, Imprisonment, and the Civil Rights Movement by Zoey A. Colley

"Imprisonment became a badge of honor for many protestors during the civil rights movement. With the popularization of expressions such as "jail-no-bail" and "jail-in," civil rights activists sought to transform arrest and imprisonment from something to be feared to a platform for the cause. Beyond Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s "Letters from the Birmingham Jail," there has been little discussion on the incarceration experiences of civil rights activists. In her debut book, Zoe Colley does what no historian has done before by following civil rights activists inside the southern jails and prisons to explore their treatment and the different responses that civil rights organizations had to mass arrest and imprisonment.

Colley focuses on the shift in philosophical and strategic responses of civil rights protestors from seeing jail as something to be avoided to seeing it as a way to further the cause. Imprisonment became a way to expose the evils of segregation, and highlighted to the rest of American society the injustice of southern racism. By drawing together the narratives of many individuals and organizations, Colley paints a clearer picture of how the incarceration of civil rights activists helped shape the course of the movement. She places imprisonment at the forefront of civil rights history and shows how these new attitudes toward arrest continue to impact contemporary society and shape strategies for civil disobedience."

from the publisher's website

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In Case You Missed It…

Welcome to Spring I 2015! We had a very busy Fall II here! In case you missed some of our news: