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LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: Spare Parts: Four Undocumented Teenagers…

cover of ''Spare Parts: Four Undocumented Teenagers, One Ugly Robot, and the Battle for the American Dream''

Spare Parts: Four Undocumented Teenagers, One Ugly Robot, and the Battle for the American Dream by Joshua Davis

"Davis offers a forceful portrait of four Mexican American teens from an impoverished neighborhood in Phoenix who became engineers and won first place in a national NASA-sponsored robotics competition. Despite their meager funds and lack of experience, these high school students, with the support of two teachers, succeed beyond all expectations, defeating well-funded teams like the one from MIT.

Throughout the book, Davis gives almost equal time to the rising tide of anti-immigrant feeling in Arizona and around the nation. These young men, all but one of who are undocumented, are painfully aware that their place in the spotlight may garner unwanted scrutiny by immigration officials. Despite their amazing win, their options continue to be severely constrained. The final chapters, which document what happened after the accolades and fanfare faded, really capture the character of these young men.

Davis takes what could have been another feelgood story of triumphant underdogs and raises the stakes by examining the difficulties of these young immigrants in the context of the societal systems that they briefly and temporarily overcame."

"Spare Parts: Four Mexican American Teenagers, One Ugly Robot, and the Battle for the American Dream." Publishers Weekly 261.40 (2014): 55. Academic Search Complete. Web. 2 Apr. 2015.

This book is in our Leisure Reading section, filed under D. Books not here in the Library can be requsted from storage (it only takes a day or so...). Instructions on how to request books are here.

Ask a librarian to help you find this or other books.

See our previous Books of the Week here.



LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: The Quantum Moment

cover of ''The Quantum Moment: How Planck, Bohr, Einstein, and Heisenberg Taught Us to Love Uncertainty''

The Quantum Moment: How Planck, Bohr, Einstein, and Heisenberg Taught Us to Love Uncertainty by Robert P. Crease and Alfred Scharff Goldhaber

"...Robert P. Crease and Alfred Scharff Goldhaber...draw on their training and six years of co-teaching to dramatize the quantum's rocky path from scientific theory to public understanding. Together, they and their students explored missteps and mistranslations, jokes and gibberish, of public discussion about the quantum. Their book explores the quantum’s manifestations in everything from art and sculpture to the prose of John Updike and David Foster Wallace. The authors reveal the quantum's implications for knowledge, metaphor, intellectual exchange, and the contemporary world. Understanding and appreciating quantum language and imagery, and recognizing its misuse, is part of what it means to be an educated person today.

The result is a celebration of language at the interface of physics and culture, perfect for anyone drawn to the infinite variety of ideas.

from the publisher's website

This book is in the New Books area in front of the Reference Desk. Books not here in the Library can be requsted from storage (it only takes a day or so...). Instructions on how to request books are here.

Ask a librarian to help you find this or other books.

See our previous Books of the Week here.



LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: The Test: Why Our Schools are Obsessed with Standardized Testing

cover of ''The Test: Why Our Schools are Obsessed with Standardized Testing – But You Don't Have to Be''

The Test: Why Our Schools are Obsessed with Standardized Testing – But You Don't Have to Be by Anya Kamenetz

"Thorough research and illuminating interviews... With abundant data assembled in an accessible format, the book is a must-read for anyone in the educational system or any parent who has a child old enough to enter preschool… An informative and enlightening appraisal of the regimented tests that American schoolchildren of all ages are subjected to taking on a regular basis."—Kirkus Reviews

"The value of Anya Kamenetz's new book, The Test, lies in her ability to avoid the soapbox style of too many books on education reform today. Her journalistic talents coupled with her role as a mother of a student on the brink of testing humanizes this book, making it a perfect entry for parents who are too deep in the muck of testing to have the clarity of distance."—Boston Globe

—Review excerpts from Kamenetz's website

This book is in our Leisure Reading section, filed under K. Don't forget: books not here in the Library can be requsted from storage (it only takes a day or so...). Instructions on how to request books are here.

Ask a librarian to help you find this or other books.

See our previous Books of the Week here.