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Today: ILLiad and CLICS

Need articles or books that the library doesn't own? Use ILLiad or CLICS!

In this workshop, participants will learn how to register for an ILLiad account and use the feature in library subscription databases to request articles via the Interlibrary Loan Service. Participants will also learn how to retrieve articles sent electronically to email accounts and how to create requests within ILLiad.

Candy! Highlighters! A raffle!

To request books from other CUNY libraries, attendees will have hands-on experience using the CLICS feature within the CUNY Catalog to submit requests. Please Note: Before the workshop, participants must register the barcode on their CUNY I. D. Card at the Library's Circulation Desk to use ILLiad and CLICS.

OPEN TO ALL LAGUARDIA STUDENTS, FACULTY AND STAFF!

  • When: Thursday, May 28, 2015
  • Time: 3:00 – 4:30 P.M.
  • Where: Library Classroom (E101-B)
  • Facilitators: Prof. Clementine Lewis and Mr. Christopher McHale

For additional information, please contact Prof. Catherine Stern [castern@lagcc.cuny.edu, x6021] or Prof. Alexandra Rojas [arojas@lagcc.cuny.edu, x6020].



LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: The Underground Girls of Kabul

Cover of ''The Underground Girls of Kabul: In Search of a Hidden Resistance in Afghanistan''

The Underground Girls of Kabul: In Search of a Hidden Resistance in Afghanistan by by Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn

"Set against the violent backdrop of America's longest war, The Underground Girls of Kabul follows Afghan girls who live disguised as boys through childhood and puberty, only to be expected by adult age to transform into subordinate wives and mothers. But the battle of nature versus nurture lingers, and some bacha posh will refuse to rescind their male prerogatives in what the UN calls the world’s most dangerous country to be a woman.

The book is anchored by vivid female characters who bring this ancient phenomenon to life: Azita, a female parliamentarian whose youngest daughter is chosen to pose as her only son; Zahra, the tomboy teenager who struggles with puberty and resists her parents’ attempts to turn her into a woman; Shukria, who was forced to marry and have three children after living for twenty years as a man; and Shahed, an Afghan special forces soldier, still in disguise as an adult man.

Offering a new and original story about Afghanistan and its women, The Underground Girls of Kabul investigates the hidden practice of bacha posh that has affected generations, while examining its parallels to our own history. The act of reaching for more freedom by impersonating a man is one that can be recognized by women everywhere."

from the website for the book

This book is in New Books (by the Reference Desk). Don't forget you can also request books from storage. Instructions on how to request books are here.

Ask a librarian to help you find resources on this or related books.



LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: A Path Appears

Cover of ''A Path Appears: Transforming Lives, Creating Opportunity''

A Path Appears: Transforming Lives, Creating Opportunity by by Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn

"An eye-opening account of the "unmatched ecological appetite" behind Coca-Cola's worldwide success. In this deeply informed debut, Elmore (History/Univ. of Alabama) details the outsourcing strategy that he calls "Coca-Cola Capitalism," which has allowed Coke to become the world's top brand, with operations in more than 200 countries, at a huge cost to the environment and human health. Acknowledging the company's marketing genius, Elmore claims that Coke's real secret formula has been to rely on other people's time and money, often using public infrastructure to extract raw materials and transport finished products. The strategy—first developed by mass marketers at the turn of the 20th century and later imitated by McDonald's, large software firms and other corporations--eliminates upfront costs and risky investments. Since its founding in 1886, Coke has relied on partnerships for the sugar, caffeine, water, cans and bottles, and other raw materials needed to create its beverages (now selling more than 1.8 billion servings per day……Without a doubt, Coke has been a good public citizen that stimulates economies and improves lives, writes the author, but the costs to taxpayers--for recycling systems, public pipes and subsidized farms--and the environment call into question how such unsustainable practices can continue in an age of scarcity."

"CITIZEN COKE." Kirkus Reviews LXXXII.19 (2014). ProQuest Social Science Journals. Web. 26 Mar. 2015.

This book is in Leisure Reading under K. Don't forget you can also request books from storage. Instructions on how to request books are here.

Ask a librarian to help you find resources on this or related books.

See our previous Books of the Week here.



LaGuardia Library Book/eBook of the Week: What Unions No Longer Do

cover of ''What Unions No Longer Do''

What Unions No Longer Do by Jake Rosenfeld

"From workers' wages to presidential elections, labor unions once exerted tremendous clout in American life. In the immediate post-World War II era, one in three workers belonged to a union. The fraction now is close to one in ten, and just one in twenty in the private sector—the lowest in a century. The only thing big about Big Labor today is the scope of its problems. While many studies have attempted to explain the causes of this decline, What Unions No Longer Do lays bare the broad repercussions of labor's collapse for the American economy and polity.

Organized labor was not just a minor player during the "golden age" of welfare capitalism in the middle decades of the twentieth century, Jake Rosenfeld asserts. Rather, for generations it was the core institution fighting for economic and political equality in the United States. Unions leveraged their bargaining power to deliver tangible benefits to workers while shaping cultural understandings of fairness in the workplace. The labor movement helped sustain an unprecedented period of prosperity among America’s expanding, increasingly multiethnic middle class.

What Unions No Longer Do shows in detail the consequences of labor’s decline: curtailed advocacy for better working conditions, weakened support for immigrants' economic assimilation, and ineffectiveness in addressing wage stagnation among African-Americans. In short, unions are no longer instrumental in combating inequality in our economy and our politics, and the result is a sharp decline in the prospects of American workers and their families."

from the publisher’s website

This book is in the New Books area in front of the Reference Desk. It is also available as an electronic book. Physical books not here in the Library can be requsted from storage (it only takes a day or so...). Instructions on how to request books are here.

Ask a librarian to help you find this or other books.

See our previous Books of the Week here.