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Retro Thursdays: KIDS FASHION SHOW

KIDS FASHION SHOW

From the Archives: Children participating in the Puttin' on the Kids Fashion Show in 1988.


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LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: Solid Foundation


Solid Foundation: an Oral History of Reggae, by David Katz

Solid Foundation

Solid Foundation is the definitive history of reggae, from the earliest Jamaican innovators of the 1940s to the new stars of the 21st century. Drawing on more than 300 firsthand interviews, this landmark book tells the fascinating story of some of the most compelling characters in popular music. It features a diverse range of pioneers, such as The Skatalites, The Wailers, Jimmy Cliff, and Lee 'Scratch' Perry, dub legends such as Augustus Pablo, Prince Jammy, and Scientist, as well as dancehall giants like Elephant Man, Beenie Man, and Buju Banton. It details the entire evolution of Jamaican popular music, including ska, rock steady, roots reggae, dub, dancehall, ragga, and more.
First published in 2003, Solid Foundation was widely praised as "a cracking read" and "a necessary work". This fully revised and updated edition brings the story into the 21st century with new chapters on the key performers of recent times and extensive additions throughout.

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MLA8 is Simply, Simpler

Having problems with MLA8? Our updated webpage is designed to help you create citations.

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MLA8 Citations



Circulation Tip: Avoid Fines

Remember when you checked out your book, both Reserve and Circulating. Most reserve materials may be borrowed for two hours, in-library use only.

Avoid Fines



LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: The Lives of Frederick Douglass


The Lives of Frederick Douglass, by Robert S. Levine

The Lives of Frederick Douglass

"A compelling scholarly study of the evolution of Frederick Douglass' thinking. Over the course of his life (1818-1895), Douglass published three autobiographies, continually revising and restructuring his life story as an ex-slave. Yet he is read and celebrated mostly for his first, The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, published in 1845 under the aegis of William Lloyd Garrison's Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society.
In this finely delineated look at Douglass' writing, Levine (English/Univ. of Maryland; Dislocating Race and Nation: Episodes in Nineteenth-Century American Literary Nationalism, 2008, etc.) urges new readings of his subject's other autobiographical works, as well as his 1853 novella, The Heroic Slave, in order to grasp a fuller understanding of how Douglass came into his own and began to move away from Garrison's "moral suasion" to an advocacy of black militancy and beyond."

- "THE LIVES OF FREDERICK DOUGLASS." Kirkus Reviews, vol. LXXXIII, no. 22, 2015. Education Database, https://rpa.laguardia.edu/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/1732577779?accountid=11946.

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Read Time Magazine in the Library

Find this and other print magazines, journals, and newspapers in our Periodicals section, where all titles are arranged alphabetically. To see if we have something in our print collection, you can consult the catalog.

Borrow an iPad or Latop



LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: From #BlackLivesMatter to Black Liberation


From #BlackLivesMatter to Black Liberation, by Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor

From BlackLivesMatter to Black liberation

"The eruption of mass protests in the wake of the police murders of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri and Eric Garner in New York City have challenged the impunity with which officers of the law carry out violence against Black people and punctured the illusion of a postracial America. The Black Lives Matter movement has awakened a new generation of activists.
In this stirring and insightful analysis, activist and scholar Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor surveys the historical and contemporary ravages of racism and persistence of structural inequality such as mass incarceration and Black unemployment. In this context, she argues that this new struggle against police violence holds the potential to reignite a broader push for Black liberation."

- From the book jacket

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Happy Groundhog Day

So what exactly is a groundhog?
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Happy Groundhog Day



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LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: The Weight of Shadows


The Weight of Shadows: A Memoir of Immigration and Displacement, by José Orduña

The Weight of Shadows

"José Orduña chronicles the process of becoming a North American citizen in a post-9/11 United States. Intractable realities—rooted in the continuity of US imperialism to globalism—form the landscape of Orduña’s daily experience, where the geopolitical meets the quotidian. In one anecdote, he recalls how the only apartment his parents could rent was one that didn’t require signing a lease or running a credit check, where the floors were so crooked he once dropped an orange and watched it roll in six directions before settling in a corner.
Orduña describes the absurd feeling of being handed a piece of paper—his naturalization certificate—that guarantees something he has always known: he has every right to be here. A trenchant exploration of race, class, and identity, The Weight of Shadows is a searing meditation on the nature of political, linguistic, and cultural borders, and the meaning of 'America.'"

- From the book jacket

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Retro Thursdays: STUDENTS UNITED WILL NEVER BE DEFEATED

STUDENTS UNITED WILL NEVER BE DEFEATED

From the Archives: A stenciled notice board with the slogan "Students United Will Never Be Defeated" in support of student protests across CUNY campus's in reaction to tuition hikes and budget cuts.


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Check Out this Research Tool

Check out BrowZine – a product we’re currently testing to make it easier to look for academic journals. Trial ends February 18. Send your feedback to .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Check out BrowZine



LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: Finding Time


Finding Time: The Economics of Work-Life Conflict, by Heather Boushey

Finding Time

"Employers today are demanding more and more of employees' time. And from campaign barbecues to the blogosphere, workers across the United States are raising the same worried question: How can I get ahead at my job while making sure my family doesn’t fall behind?
Heather Boushey argues that resolving work–life conflicts is as vital for individuals and families as it is essential for realizing the country's productive potential. The federal government, however, largely ignores the connection between individual work–life conflicts and more sustainable economic growth. The consequence: business and government treat the most important things in life—health, children, elders—as matters for workers to care about entirely on their own time and dime. That might have worked in the past, but only thanks to a hidden subsidy: the American Wife, a behind-the-scenes, stay-at-home fixer of what economists call market failures. When women left the home—out of desire and necessity—the old system fell apart. Families and the larger economy have yet to recover.
But change is possible. Finding Time presents detailed innovations to help Americans find the time they need and help businesses attract more productive workers. A policy wonk with working-class roots and a deep understanding of the stresses faced by families up and down the income ladder, Heather Boushey demonstrates with clarity and compassion that economic efficiency and equity do not have to be enemies. They can be reconciled if we have the vision to forge a new social contract for business, government, and private citizens."

- From the book jacket

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Name that Year!

From the Archives: What yearbook is this?

What yearbook is this

Year will be revealed on Monday