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Global Road Warrior and AtoZ World Travel

Plan your next trip using the travel guides in the Global Road Warrior and the AtoZ World Travel databases!

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Circulation Tip: Avoid Fines

Remember when you checked out your book, both Reserve and Circulating. Most reserve materials may be borrowed for two hours, in-library use only.

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LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: Wade in the Water


Wade in the Water: Poems, by Tracy K. Smith (Poet Laureate of the United States)

Book cover for Wade in the Water

"In Wade in the Water, Tracy K. Smith boldly ties America’s contemporary moment both to our nation’s fraught founding history and to a sense of the spirit, the everlasting. These are poems of sliding scale: some capture a flicker of song or memory; some collage an array of documents and voices; and some push past the known world into the haunted, the holy. Smith’s signature voice—inquisitive, lyrical, and wry—turns over what it means to be a citizen, a mother, and an artist in a culture arbitrated by wealth, men, and violence. Here, private utterance becomes part of a larger choral arrangement as the collection widens to include erasures of the Declaration of Independence and the correspondence between slave owners, a found poem comprised of evidence of corporate pollution and accounts of near-death experiences, a sequence of letters written by African Americans enlisted in the Civil War, and the survivors’ reports of recent immigrants and refugees. Wade in the Water is a potent and luminous book by one of America’s essential poets.”

- from the publisher’s website: www.graywolfpress.org/books/wade-water.

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Win a Free 16GB Flashdrive

Library Website Usability Study

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Earn a free 16GB flashdrive by participating in a study of a new library website. Participants will be asked to answer questions by navigating the library’s new website. Sessions will last approximately forty-five minutes and can be scheduled any weekday in July or August.

Eligible to LaGuardia Community College students only!

To participate in the study, fill out this form and someone will contact.



Read Sky & Telescope in the Library

Find this and other print magazines, journals, and newspapers in our Periodicals section, where all titles are arranged alphabetically. To see if we have something in our print collection, please visit the Library Catalog webpage.
Note: The first floor of the Library houses current editions and the mezzanine level houses both current editions and archived copies.



LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: Utopia is Creepy


Utopia is Creepy: and Other Provocations, by Nicholas Carr

Book cover for Utopia is Creepy

"Carr is the dean of technology skeptics, having risen to general public prominence with his 2008 essay 'Is Google Making Us Stupid?' This is a new collection of pieces written over the last decade or so. Most are taken from his blog, Rough Type, with about a dozen from other outlets.

Like any collection of timely dispatches, some are too 'of the moment.' Arguments about Second Life and Myspace feel like Quemoy and Matsu, once vital, now trivia. Others are startlingly prescient: 'Should the Net Forget' (2007) helped kick off the debate about the right to be forgotten; 'The Hierarchy of Innovation' (2012) remains a key text in the argument about the value of new digital tools.

Carr's natural length is the essay. The best material here is the longest, because his core commitment is not denunciation but reframing. 'Long Player,' his 2007 argument about the album format as an aesthetic unit, is subtle and capacious. (I have publicly disagreed with some of its conclusions, but am better for having read it. Carr also takes lively issue with some of my ideas in the 2008 essay 'Gilligan's Web.')

Then there's 'The Love That Lays the Swale in Rows,' for my money the best essay Carr has ever written. The piece contains the thesis for much of his work: 'Technology is a pillar and a glory of civilization. But it is also a test that we set for ourselves.' Carr's great concern is wondering whether we can pass that test.”

- Shirky, Clay. "People and Technology." The New York Times Book Review, 9 Oct. 2016, p. 34(L). Literature Resource Center, http://link.galegroup.com/apps/doc/A465929861/LitRC?u=cuny_laguardia&sid=LitRC&xid=96bf8009.

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Visit the Media Desk: Borrow an iPad or Latop

iPads and Latops are available for 3-day loan



MoneyBoss: Identity Theft

The Money Boss Series is Back

Identity Theft
Today, 11:45 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.
Poolside Cafe

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Visit the MoneyBoss website for our guide to personal finance resources and future event announcements.



Win a Free 16GB Flashdrive

Library Website Usability Study

Picture of prototype Library website

Earn a free 16GB flashdrive by participating in a study of a new library website. Participants will be asked to answer questions by navigating the library’s new website. Sessions will last approximately forty-five minutes and can be scheduled any weekday in July or August.

Eligible to LaGuardia Community College students only!

To participate in the study, fill out this form and someone will contact.



Have a question? Ask LaGuardia!

Go to the Ask LaGuardia webpage to get answers to your questions about LaGuardia Community College



LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: We Wanted a Revolution


We Wanted a Revolution: Black Radical Women, 1965-85, by Darnell L. More

Book cover for We Wanted a Revolution

This sourcebook accompanied an exhibition at the Brooklyn Museum last year. That exhibit examined “the political, social, cultural, and aesthetic priorities of women of color during the emergence of second-wave feminism.”

The Sourcebook republishes “an array of rare and little-known documents from the period by artists, writers, cultural critics, and art historians such as Gloria Anzaldúa, James Baldwin, bell hooks, Lucy R. Lippard, Audre Lorde, Toni Morrison, Lowery Stokes Sims, Alice Walker, and Michelle Wallace. These documents include articles, manifestos, and letters from significant publications as well as interviews, some of which are reproduced in facsimile form. The Sourcebook also includes archival materials, rare ephemera, and an art-historical overview essay. Helping readers to move beyond standard narratives of art history and feminism, this volume will ignite further scholarship while showing the true breadth and diversity of black women’s engagement with art, the art world, and politics from the 1960s to the 1980s.”

- Quotes are from the publisher’s website: https://www.dukeupress.edu/we-wanted-a-revolution.

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Retro Thursdays: The John Williams Record Collection

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Fun and Fitness?!?! Count me in! Call# R 9953 from the John W. Williams Collection.

Visit the Institutional Archives



MoneyBoss: Tips Every College Student Should Know

The Money Boss Series is Back

Tips Every College Student Should Know: Money Management for College and Beyond
Today, 10:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.
E242

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Visit the MoneyBoss website for our guide to personal finance resources and future event announcements.



LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: No Ashes in the Fire


No Ashes in the Fire: Coming of Age Black & Free in America, by Darnell L. More

Book cover for No Ashes in the Fire

No Ashes in the Fire illuminates the fragility of black life no matter how much love surrounds it. As he grapples with social tragedy and the insecurity of black masculinity, Moore displays magnificent self-reflection. He narrates his story in a looping, lyrical style that approaches complicated truths through metaphor.... For Moore, these efforts often take the form of an empathy that borders on the transcendent.”
- Dawn Lundy Martin, Bookforum

No Ashes in the Fire is part memoir, part social commentary. Darnell honestly tells his story with an intensity and passion that offers readers a deep understanding of a gay black male coming of age who open-heartedly claims his identity, and who embraces redemptive suffering. Ultimately, he reaches out to everyone with an inclusive love."
- bell hooks

See our previous Books of the Week here

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