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LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: Entanglement


Entanglement: The Secret Lives of Hair, by Emma Tarlo

Entanglement

“When it's not attached to your head, your very own hair takes on a disconcerting quality. Suddenly, it is strange. And yet hair finds its way into all manner of unexpected places, far from our heads, including cosmetics, clothes, ropes, personal and public collections, and even food. Whether treated as waste or as gift, relic, sacred offering or commodity in a billion-dollar industry for wigs and hair extensions, hair has many stories to tell.
Collected from Hindu temples and Buddhist nunneries and salvaged by the strand from waste heaps and the combs of long-haired women, hair flows into the industry from many sources. Entering this strange world, Emma Tarlo travels the globe, tracking its movement across India, Myanmar, China, Africa, the United States, Britain and Europe, where she meets people whose livelihoods depend on hair. Viewed from inside Chinese wig factories, Hindu temples and the villages of Myanmar, or from Afro hair fairs, Jewish wig parlours, fashion salons and hair loss clinics in Britain and the United States, hair is oddly revealing of the lives of all it touches.
From fashion and beauty to religion, politics and cultural identity, Emma Tarlo explores just how much our locks and curls tell us about who we are. Full of surprising revelations and penetrating insights, Entanglement will change the way you see hair forever.”

- From the book jacket.

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Retro Thursdays: A Warm Tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Martin Luther King Jr. Day, January 15

Martin Luther King Jr.

From the Archives: A Warm Tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in the The Bridge


See more publications in the Institutional Archives



LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: Excellent Daughters


Excellent Daughters: The Secret Lives of Young Women Who Are Transforming the Arab World, by Katherine Zoepf

Hallelujah Anyway

“Zoepf, a journalist who has covered the Middle East for the New York Times, fluidly merges memoir with reportage while showing the Arab world from a unique perspective: that of an American woman who managed to win uncommonly intimate access to urban Muslim women in Saudi Arabia, Syria, Lebanon, and the United Arab Emirates between 2004 and 2011. Zoepf's Arabic, along with her "glimpses behind [the] closed doors" of women's spaces, lends authority to her lucid accounts of Islamic history, practices, and controversies. Though she covers some widely publicized events, such as the 2007 "honor killing" of a Damascus woman and the 1990 protests in which Riyadh women defied Saudi law by driving cars, her focus is on day-to-day aspects of women's lives: the showfa (the "viewing," literally, of a newly engaged Saudi woman), the hijab, the Qubaisiate (a fundamentalist women's prayer group), the difficulties of finding employment, and the obsession with female chastity (including forcible "virginity testing"). Mindful that "strange as I'd found it at first, life in this women-only world must have its own consolations," her work acknowledges that some women accept and find value in strict traditional mores. In her absorbing, window-opening book, Zoepf reveals the variety of women's lives and interests away from political headlines and conventional stereotypes, and their power, often by small steps, to transform their world.”

- "Excellent Daughters: The Secret Lives of the Young Women Who Are Transforming the Arab World." Publishers Weekly, 12 Oct. 2015, p. 56+. Academic OneFile, http://link.galegroup.com/apps/doc/A435387824/AONE?u=cuny_laguardia&sid=AONE&xid=bcde93fc.

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Read Oprah Magazine in the Library

Find this and other print magazines, journals, and newspapers in our Periodicals section, where all titles are arranged alphabetically. To see if we have something in our print collection, please visit the Library Catalog webpage.
Note: The first floor of the Library houses current editions and the mezzanine level houses both current editions and archived copies.



Visit the Media Help Desk: Borrow an iPad or Latop



Have a question? Ask LaGuardia!

Go to the Ask LaGuardia webpage to get answers to your questions about LaGuardia Community College



LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: Hallelujah Anyway


Hallelujah Anyway: Rediscovering Mercy, by Anne Lamott

Hallelujah Anyway

“With her trademark humor and candor, Lamott (Help, Thanks, Wow) explores the scriptural imperative from Old Testament Prophet Micah to “love mercy,” reviewing both the difficulties and the life-changing rewards of obeying this mandate. Casting a fresh eye on well-known biblical figures such as Jonah, the Good Samaritan, and Lazarus, Lamott drolly attests to the subversive yet sustaining power of simple acts of kindness in the face of life’s inevitable devastations: “This collective, imperfect, hesitant help is another kind of miracle. Naturally one wants to avoid these kinds of miracles.” Lamott’s collective first-person voice makes generalizations that may not resonate with all her readers (“Learning to read gave us a true oasis, salvation”), but in revealing her painful personal struggles, she taps into universal feelings. For example, Lamott recalls the fallout brought on by a “snarky public comment” she made that not only elicited public castigation (“My attackers were like a mob with pitchforks, shaming adorable, progressive me”) but, worse, caused an excruciating rift with her son. As in previous works, Lamott’s courageous honesty and humility, laced with wit and compassion, offer wisdom and hope for difficult times.”

- "Hallelujah Anyway: Rediscovering Mercy." Publishers Weekly, 13 Feb. 2017, p. 69. Academic OneFile, link.galegroup.com/apps/doc/A482198234/AONE?u=cuny_laguardia&sid=AONE&xid=4584f938.

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Exhibit: It’s Sweater Weather-Curl Up with a Good Book!

Exhibit: It's Sweater Weather-Curl Up with a Good Book

Come see this new exhibit right outside the Library (E-101)



Happy Holidays!

Happy Holidays



LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: Stretch


Stretch: Unlock the Power of Less—and Achieve More Than you Ever Imagined, by Scott Sonenshein

Stretch

“Stretching is the "science of resourcefulness," according to Sonenshein. It's improvising with things on hand instead of searching for the perfect tool. It's being content with what we have rather than weighing our worth against others' accomplishments. And it's refusing to be limited by plans and resources. The author uses stories of successful (and not successful) ventures to illustrate the way that a "stretching" mind-set allows entrepreneurs, artists, and everyday people to stop chasing after more. Admitting that problems are more often solved by outsiders rather than experts, Sonenshein urges readers to move outside their comfort zone and broaden their knowledge rather than hyperfocusing. He offers specific exercises to strengthen a "stretch," including shopping in your own closet, breaking down common things into their component parts to find new uses, and making midyear resolutions. Finally, the author warns of the dangers of overstretching, such as becoming a cheapskate rather than frugal or losing focus when relying completely on improvisation. The emphasis on self-reliance and commonsense is reassuring, and readers will find themselves looking at their surroundings and problems with fresh eyes.”

- Smith, Candace. "Stretch: Unlock the Power of Less-and Achieve More than You Ever Imagined." The Booklist, vol. 113, no. 9, 2017, pp. 19, Education Database, https://rpa.laguardia.edu/login?url=https://search.proquest.com/docview/1859702339?accountid=11946.

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Faculty Fridays: Scholarly Communications and Academic Works

City Tech librarian Monica Berger beautifully explicates, “when you share your work in Academic Works [...] you are making a major contribution to a sustainable scholarly future.”
Academic Works, CUNY’s open access institutional repository, supports scholarly communications by disseminating and preserving faculty scholarship.
Do you want to increase the reach of your scholarly works and ensure its lasting impact for future generations? Take a look at Academic Work’s submission policies and reach out to your librarian if you need assistance!

Scholarly Communications and Academic Works


From the ACRL toolkit

ACRL Toolkit


- Post created by Kathleen Fox, MLS student at CUNY Queens College and Health Sciences Librarian at NYC Health + Hospitals / Elmhurst



Read Ms. Magazine

Find this and other print magazines, journals, and newspapers in our Periodicals section, where all titles are arranged alphabetically. To see if we have something in our print collection, please visit the Library Catalog webpage.
Note: The first floor of the Library houses current editions and the mezzanine level houses both current editions and archived copies.



Visit the Media Desk: Request a Group Study Room

Group study and presentation practice rooms are available for use by current LaGuardia Community College students, please visit the Reservations webpage to make a request.



LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: Incendiary Art


Incendiary Art: Poems, by Patricia Smith

Incendiary Art

“One of the most magnetic and esteemed poets in today’s literary landscape, Patricia Smith fearlessly confronts the tyranny against the black male body and the tenacious grief of mothers in her compelling new collection, Incendiary Art. She writes an exhaustive lament for mothers of the "dark magicians," and revisits the devastating murder of Emmett Till. These dynamic sequences serve as a backdrop for present-day racial calamities and calls for resistance. Smith embraces elaborate and eloquent language— "her gorgeous fallen son a horrid hidden / rot. Her tiny hand starts crushing roses—one by one / by one she wrecks the casket’s spray. It’s how she / mourns—a mother, still, despite the roar of thorns"— as she sharpens her unerring focus on incidents of national mayhem and mourning. Smith envisions, reenvisions, and ultimately reinvents the role of witness with an incendiary fusion of forms, including prose poems, ghazals, sestinas, and sonnets. With poems impossible to turn away from, one of America’s most electrifying writers reveals what is frightening, and what is revelatory, about history.”

- From the publisher’s website, www.nupress.northwestern.edu/content/incendiary-art.

PATRICIA SMITH is a National Book Award finalist (2008) and the author of six critically acknowledged volumes of poetry. She is a Cave Canem faculty member, an associate professor of English at CUNY/College of Staten Island, and a faculty member in the Sierra Nevada College M.F.A. program.

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