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Nostalgia Notes: Library Staff Saves Fallen Commuter

From the Fall 2006 edition of Library Notes

Eric Moy Saves Fallen Commuter


Library Notes is a publication of the LaGuardia Community College Library
See more editions on the Library Notes Webpage



Read Black Enterprise in the Library

Find this and other print magazines, journals, and newspapers in our Periodicals section, where all titles are arranged alphabetically. To see if we have something in our print collection, please visit the Library Catalog webpage.
Note: The first floor of the Library houses current editions and the mezzanine level houses both current editions and archived copies.

Black Enterprise in the Library



Visit the Media Lab

Located on the second floor of the Library (E-201), the Media Lab has both PCs and Macs available for student assignments, media playback and independent learning.

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LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: The Art of the Blues


The Art of the Blues: A Visual Treasury of Black Music’s Golden Age, by Bill Dahl

The Art of the Blues

“…The blues have been one of the most ubiquitous but diverse elements of American popular music at large, and the visual art associated with this unique sound has been just as varied and dynamic. There is no better guide to this fascinating graphical world than Bill Dahl—a longtime music journalist and historian who has written liner notes for countless reissues of classic blues, soul, R&B, and rock albums. With his deep knowledge and incisive commentary—complementing more than three hundred and fifty lavishly reproduced images—the history of the blues comes musically and visually to life. …..What these images collectively portray is the evolution of a distinctively American art form. And they do so in the richest way imaginable. The result is a sumptuous book, a visual treasury as alive in spirit as the music it so vibrantly captures.”

- From the publisher’s website: http://press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/chicago/A/bo25019308.html.

See our previous Books of the Week here

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Exhibit: Black History Matters

Exhibit: Black History Matters

Come see this new exhibit right outside the Library (E-101)



Have a question? Ask LaGuardia!

Go to the Ask LaGuardia webpage to get answers to your questions about LaGuardia Community College

Ask LaGuardia



Recent Books on Black Lives Matter

Book Covers on Black Lives Matter



You Finally Have a Restroom!

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At last, the Library has a restroom for students.


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Our recent Question of the Week displayed your collective voice. You're not alone!


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The restroom is on the second floor in Room P.


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A deluxe and comforting place...and clean!



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LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: The Mythology of Crime and Criminal Justice


The Mythology of Crime and Criminal Justice, by Victor E. Kappeler and Gary W. Potter

The Mythology of Crime and Criminal Justice

“The social construction of crime is often out of proportion to the threat posed. The media and advocacy groups shine a spotlight on some crimes and ignore others. Street crime is highlighted as putting everyone at risk of victimization, while the greater social harms from corporate malfeasance receive far less attention.
Social arrangements dictate what is defined as crime and the punishments for those who engage in the proscribed behavior. Interest groups promote their agendas by appealing to public fears. Justifications often have no basis in fact, but the public accepts the exaggerations and blames the targeted offenders. The net-widening effect of more laws and more punishment catches those least able to defend themselves.
This innovative alternative to traditional textbooks provides insightful observations of myths and trends in criminal justice. Fourteen chapters challenge misconceptions about specific crimes or aspects of the criminal justice system. Kappeler and Potter dissect popular images of crimes and criminals in a cogent, compelling, and engaging manner. They trace the social construction of each issue and identify the misleading statistics and fears that form the basis of myths—and the collateral damage of basing policies on mythical beliefs. The authors encourage skepticism about commonly accepted beliefs, offer readers a fresh perspective, and urge them to analyze important issues from novel vantage points.”

- From the publisher’s website: https://www.waveland.com/browse.php?t=282.

See our previous Books of the Week here

Ask a librarian to help you find this or other resources on this topic.



Nostalgia Notes: Library Staff Saves Fallen Commuter

Eric Moy Saves Fallen Commuter


Library Notes is a publication of the LaGuardia Community College Library
See more editions on the Library Notes Webpage



Check Out this Research Tool

Slavery and Anti-Slavery: A Transnational Archive – Check out this primary source collection of the slavery system from the 16th through the 19th centuries.



LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: From Bacteria to Bach and Back


From Bacteria to Bach and Back: The Evolution of Minds, by Daniel C. Dennett

From Bacteria to Bach and Back

“For five decades, Dennett (cognitive studies, Tufts Univ.; Darwin's Dangerous Idea; Consciousness Explained) has been writing about the implications of Darwinian evolution, the origin of language, and the evolution of the human mind. His main objective here is to show that humans are different from all other species, primarily because memes--in the form of words--transformed our brains into minds. (The term meme was originally coined by Richard Dawkins in The Selfish Gene and refers to a unit of culturally transmitted information.) Drawing upon research and concepts from the fields of computer science, neuroscience, cognitive science, artificial intelligence, evolutionary biology, theoretical linguistics, and information science, Dennett brilliantly uses analogy, metaphor, and counterintuitive reasoning to construct his arguments. Verdict: This sweeping examination of biological and cultural evolution as seen through a philosopher's lens is highly recommended for academics as well as nonspecialists who enjoy Dawkins, Steven Pinker, and Douglas Hofstadter.”

- Knight, Cynthia Lee. "Dennett, Daniel C. From Bacteria to Bach and Back: The Evolution of Minds." Library Journal 141.20 (2016): 119.

See our previous Books of the Week here

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Circulation Tip: Browse the 14-Day Permanent Reserve

Additional copies of textbooks as well as outdated editions of currently used textbooks are available in the Permanent Reserve Textbook Collection for a 14-day loan.



Faculty Fridays: Librarian Posts on Open @ CUNY Blog

Read the work of our librarians, Liz Jardine and Ann Matsuuchi, on Open @ CUNY blog

Librarian Posts on Open CUNY Blog