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Open Access Week: NIH

Some great links and information from Marie C. Spina, our Institutional Archivist:

According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Public Access policy page, beginning April 7, 2008, all peer-reviewed manuscripts based on NIH funding must be deposited to PubMed Central upon acceptance for publication. Full-text of the articles will become publicly available and searchable in PubMed Central no later than 12 months after publication in a journal.
Failure to comply may delay or prevent awarding of NIH funds, although noncompliance is not a factor in the evaluation of grant applications.

More information is available here: http://publicaccess.nih.gov/ and here: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-OD-09-071.html and here: http://www.righttoresearch.org/

You also might want to explore Columbia University's Open Access Week page: http://scholcomm.columbia.edu/2011/10/04/open-access-week-2011/

BioMed Central is an open access publisher, specializing in science, technology, and medicine: http://www.biomedcentral.com/info/update

Finally, please don't forget about Project Gutenberg, one the brightest (and earliest!) lights in the Open Access movement.



Open Access Week: Queer Zine Archive Project

From librarian Lydia Willoughby:

screenshot of qzap.org site

The Queer Zine Archive Project (QZAP) is an open access project to preserve queer zines (if you’re not sure what a zine is, the New York Times recently had an article about them). On the QZAP site, you’ll find over 300 zines, with plans to digitize more. You can browse the archive of zines here: http://www.qzap.org/v6/index.php?option=com_g2bridge&view=gallery&Itemid=41 and search it here: http://www.qzap.org/v6/index.php?option=com_search&Itemid=30

QZAP will be the benefiting organization of the next Que(e)ry Party event. Que(e)ry Party is a benefit party that donates 100% of its proceeds to libraries and archives that preserve LGBT and queer heritage and culture. Designed by and for librarians, each party has a library-related theme, and to celebrate the Open Access movement, the next party’s theme is Open Access. Open access content film and media will be shown at the party.

Que(e)ry V: Open Access, will be held Saturday, November 19th, at the Stonewall Inn (53 Christopher St., NYC) from 9pm to 4am. $5-$10 suggested donation at the door. All proceeds benefit the QZAP. Guests are invited to bring their own zines to trade with other zinesters, and to share with NYC area zine librarians. There will also be raffles and dancing.



Know your Author Rights

This video from SPARC (The Scholarly Publishing & Academic Resources Coalition) addresses the issue of author rights, which fits under the broad umbrella of Open Access. When writing an article or, otherwise creating new knowledge, the copyright, in almost all cases, belongs automatically to the author. The author may give away the rights, and when publishing an article in a journal, generally does give them away when signing the publisher’s contract. Publishers’ contracts often ask for all the rights to the article, but SPARC urges authors to manage their rights and to retain the rights they need to ensure the widest possible access to their scholarly work in the future. Here are the 3 steps recommended by SPARC for effective rights management:

  1. Scrutinize the publication agreement
  2. Negotiate with the publisher
  3. Retain the rights you need.


Open Access Week 2011: Academic Journal Prices? Pretty scary!

We all need access to full-text academic journals to do research, right? Any idea how much it costs CUNY libraries? Take this Halloween-themed quiz created by the Brooklyn College Library Open Access team to find out more: http://openaccess.commons.gc.cuny.edu/2011/10/17/220/




It’s Open Access Week!

Today marks the start of Open Access Week. To commemorate it, every day we'll be posting about open access issues.

Open access refers to the concept of free and immediate access to scholarly research and publications. As anyone who works in academia will tell you, open access, for many disciplines, is the exception, rather than the rule.

Open Access Week is an opportunity to share the benefits of open access publishing with new people.

There is a CUNY-centric Open Access Week site on the CUNY Commons.

If you're interested in perusing some open access research, you can check out the Directory of Open Access Journals: http://www.doaj.org/.

Finally, a great entry point into the open access world is Peter Suber's Open Access Overview page, which is comprehensive without being overwhelming.

Why do we here at the Library care about open access? Because we're all about providing access to our patrons, and too often we're priced out of access by publishers. Open access puts all schools and libraries, regardless of their budgets, on equal footing.



Short Takes on 10/27/11: Alice Munro and Joyce Carol Oates

Next reading: Thurs. October 27, 2:30-4:00 in the Library Conference Room: Alice Munro and Joyce Carol Oates, "Free Radicals" & "Pumpkin Head" from The New Yorker

The theme this fall is: Mothers, Maidens, Martyrs, Mayhem.

Please take a look at the schedule of short stories from around the world. As always, everyone is welcome to the sessions where students, faculty,staff and members of our local communities share insights and cookies. Remember there are rewards for students who attend three sessions - a collection of stories and a certificate. Everyone brings ideas and access to the stories will be at the Library Reference desk. Come early or join in late and get a really good reading list and make new friends. See you each Thursday (except Thanksgiving Day) until Dec 1.



Join us for Short Takes on 10/20/11: Toni Cade Bambara and Eudora Welty

The theme this fall is: Mothers, Maidens, Martyrs, Mayhem.

Please take a look at the schedule of short stories from around the world. As always, everyone is welcome to the sessions where students, faculty,staff and members of our local communities share insights and cookies. Remember there are rewards for students who attend three sessions - a collection of stories and a certificate. Everyone brings ideas and access to the stories will be at the Library Reference desk. Come early or join in late and get a really good reading list and make new friends. See you each Thursday (except Thanksgiving Day) until Dec 1.

Next reading: Thurs. October 20, 2:30-4:00 in the Library Conference Room: Toni Cade Bambara and Eudora Welty "My Man Bovanne" & "No Place For You My Love" from We Are The Stories We Tell



Join us for Short Takes on 10/13/11: Lorrie Moore

Short Takes on Literature is back!

The theme this fall is: Mothers, Maidens, Martyrs, Mayhem.

Please take a look at the schedule of short stories from around the world. As always, everyone is welcome to the sessions where students, faculty,staff and members of our local communities share insights and cookies. Remember there are rewards for students who attend three sessions - a collection of stories and a certificate. Everyone brings ideas and access to the stories will be at the Library Reference desk. Come early or join in late and get a really good reading list and make new friends. See you each Thursday (except Thanksgiving Day) until Dec 1.

Next reading: Thurs. October 13, 2:30-4:00 in the Library Conference Room: Lorrie Moore
"Four Calling Birds, Three French Hens" & "Which is More Than I Can Say About Some People" from Birds of America



Library will be closed Oct. 8-10

The Library will be closed Saturday, 10/08/11 to Monday, 10/10. We will be open regular hours on Tuesday, 10/11/11. There will be no classes this weekend. Happy holidays!