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LaGuardia Library Book(s) of the Week: Leisure Reading

map to the Leisure Collection

Pick one just for fun!

The Library has a Leisure Reading collection which includes books we think LaGuardia students, staff and faculty might enjoy. It includes popular fiction, nonfiction, biographies, and self-help books.

The rest of the collection is shelved near the windows and the periodicals. Ask a librarian if you need help or if you have any questions about t his collection.

cover of ''The Butler'' cover of ''After Her''

cover of ''The Buy Side'' cover of ''Ghost Bride''

You can also see our Leisure Reading in the catalog.

See our previous Books of the Week here.



LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: How Sex Became a Civil Liberty

Cover of ''How Sex Became a Civil Liberty''

How Sex Became a Civil Liberty by Leigh Ann Wheeler

"How Sex Became a Civil Liberty is the first book to show how and why we have come to see sexual expression, sexual practice, and sexual privacy as fundamental rights. Using rich archival sources and oral interviews, historian Leigh Ann Wheeler shows how the private lives of women and men in the American Civil Liberties Union shaped their understanding of sexual rights as they built the constitutional foundation for the twentieth-century's sexual revolutions.

...

Wheeler explores the ACLU's prominent role in nearly every major court decision related to sexuality while examining how the ACLU also promoted its agenda through grassroots activism, political action, and public education. She shows how the ACLU helped to collapse distinctions between public and private in ways that privileged access to sexual expression over protection from it. Thanks largely to the organization's work, abortion and birth control are legal, coerced sterilization is rare, sexually explicit material is readily available, and gay rights are becoming a reality. But this book does not simply applaud the creation of a sex-saturated culture and the arming of citizens with sexual rights; it shows how hard-won rights for some often impinged upon freedoms held dear by others."

From the publisher's website

This book will be shelved at KF9325 .W47 2013 with other books on law once it is not a "New book".

Ask a librarian to help you find this or other books.

See our previous Books of the Week here.



LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: Habitats: Private Lives in the Big City

Cover of ''Habitats: Private Lives in the Big City''

Habitats: Private Lives in the Big City by Constance Rosenblum

"There may be eight million stories in the Naked City, but there are also nearly three million dwelling places, ranging from Park Avenue palaces to Dickensian garrets and encompassing much in between. The doorways to these residences are tantalizing portals opening onto largely invisible lives. Habitats offers 40 vivid and intimate stories about how New Yorkers really live in their brownstones, their apartments, their mansions, their lofts, and as a whole presents a rich, multi-textured portrait of what it means to make a home in the world’s most varied and powerful city.

These essays, expanded versions of a selection of the Habitats column published in the Real Estate section of The New York Times, take readers to both familiar and remote sections of the city—to history-rich townhouses, to low-income housing projects, to out-of-the-way places far from the beaten track, to every corner of the five boroughs—and introduce them to a wide variety of families and individuals who call New York home. These pieces reveal a great deal about the city's past and its rich store of historic dwellings. Along with exploring the deep and even mystical connections people feel to the place where they live, these pieces, taken as a whole, offer a mosaic of domestic life in one of the world’s most fascinating cities and a vivid portrait of the true meaning of home in the 21st-century metropolis."

From the publisher's website

This book will be shelved at HD7304 .N5 R59 2013 with other books on housing once it is not a "New book".

Ask a librarian to help you find this or other books.

See our previous Books of the Week here.



Going Beyond Google Again

Profs. Jane Devine and Francine Egger-Sider's latest book, Going Beyond Google Again, was featured in the March/April 2014 issue of American Libraries: http://www.americanlibrariesmagazine.org/issue/marchapril-2014 (p. 48-51) [Direct link to the article in Academic Search Complete here: https://mail.lagcc.cuny.edu/viplogin/default.aspx?redirect=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h&AN=94770773&site=ehost-live] Take a look and check out a great selection of specialized online research tools that you might not have seen before.



LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: Envisioning Emancipation

Cover of ''Envisioning Emancipation: Black Americans and the End of Slavery''

Envisioning Emancipation: Black Americans and the End of Slavery by Deborah Willis and Barbara Krauthamer

"The Emancipation Proclamation is one of the most important documents in American history. As we commemorate its 150th anniversary, what do we really know about those who experienced slavery?

In their pioneering book, Envisioning Emancipation, renowned photographic historian Deborah Willis and historian of slavery Barbara Krauthamer have amassed 150 photographs—some never before published—from the antebellum days of the 1850s through the New Deal era of the 1930s. The authors vividly display the seismic impact of emancipation on African Americans born before and after the Proclamation, providing a perspective on freedom and slavery and a way to understand the photos as documents of engagement, action, struggle, and aspiration.

Envisioning Emancipation illustrates what freedom looked like for black Americans in the Civil War era. From photos of the enslaved on plantations and African American soldiers and camp workers in the Union Army to Juneteenth celebrations, slave reunions, and portraits of black families and workers in the American South, the images in this book challenge perceptions of slavery. They show not only what the subjects emphasized about themselves but also the ways Americans of all colors and genders opposed slavery and marked its end.

Filled with powerful images of lives too often ignored or erased from historical records, Envisioning Emancipation provides a new perspective on American culture.

From the publisher's website

This book will be shelved at HE 185.2 W68 2013 with other books on African-American history once it is not a "New book".

Ask a librarian to help you find this or other books.

See our previous Books of the Week here.



In Case You Missed It: Black History Month at the Library

Black History Month is over, but you can still check-out the Library's Black History Month display, right outside of the Library.

closeup photo of the Library's Black History Month display

photo of the Library's Black History Month display

For more on the display, be sure to visit our Tumblr and follow us on Instagram.



LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: Munich 1972

Cover of ''Munich 1972: Tragedy, Terror, and Triumph at the Olympic Games''

Munich 1972: Tragedy, Terror, and Triumph at the Olympic Games by David Clay Large

"This timely book reminds readers that politics have always shaped the Olympic Games. A respected authority on the Third Reich, Large (Montana State Univ.; Nazi Games) explains how the XX Olympic Games in Munich marked a turning point in Olympic and sports history generally. He thoroughly details the murder of Israeli athletes by pro-Palestine Black September terrorists.

The author's description is especially valuable because he places the attack within the larger contexts of contemporary international tensions (Cold War, Vietnam War protests, African decolonization, Middle Eastern conflicts) and West Germany's attempt to distance itself from the so-called "Nazi Olympics" of 1936 Berlin. Munich 1972 also describes the first superexpensive Olympic Games, complete with artist competitions, extravagant ceremonies, and huge building projects. Large pays great attention to the competition itself and writes vibrantly about many sports. The book therefore nicely blends the work of scholar and fan. While his nuanced picture of West Germany's security failures sheds light on the modern history of Germany and sports, overall Large does not break new scholarly ground. His pitch is broader. This thoughtful, readable piece on a major event of the modern era will appeal to many people."

Imhoof, D. M.1. "Munich 1972: Tragedy, Terror, And Triumph At The Olympic Games." Choice: Current Reviews For Academic Libraries 50.3 (2012): 560-561. Choice Reviews Online. Web. 20 Feb. 2014.

This book will be shelved at HV 6433 G32 L37 2012 with other books on crime once it is not a "New book".

Ask a librarian to help you find this or other books.

See our previous Books of the Week here.