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LaGuardia Library Books of the Week: Gratitude

Cover of ''The Gratitude Diaries: How a Year Looking on the Bright Side Can Transform Your Life'' Cover of ''Gratitude: An Intellectual History''

The Gratitude Diaries: How a Year Looking on the Bright Side Can Transform Your Life by Janice Kaplan

"A heartfelt, thoughtful, and entertaining read on how we can bring more gratitude into our lives. It’s like The Happiness Project meets Thanksgiving—a guided tour through the science and experience of appreciation."

—Adam Grant, Wharton professor and New York Times bestselling author of Give and Take

Gratitude: An Intellectual History by Peter J. Leithart

"This is no 'gratitude lite' approach with its blending of philosophical, theological, political, and social sciences perspectives. Leithart persuasively makes a case for why gratitude is intrinsically interesting."

—Robert Emmons, co-editor of The Psychology of Gratitude, and author of Thanks! and Gratitude Works!

The Gratitude Diaries is found in Leisure Reading (back by the magazines and newspapers). Don't forget you can also request books from storage. Instructions on how to request books are here.

Gratitude: An Intellectual History is an ebook. It's available any time from anywhere!

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You can see our previous Book of the Week selections here.



LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: Dollarocracy

Dollarocracy: How the Money and Media Election Complex is Destroying America

Dollarocracy: How the Money and Media Election Complex is Destroying America by John Nichols and Robert W. McChesney

"Nichols and McChesney (coauthors of The Death and Life of American Journalism and cofounders of Free Press, a media reform group) are both despairing and hopeful in this incisive account of what they see as corporate America's hijacking of the election process. While the $10 billion spent in the 2012 presidential election was unprecedented, America's plutocrats have long been determined to make their vote count. Though contesting this trend is a deeply rooted American tradition, it's troubling to read about dismantled restrictions against corporate dominance, beginning with Supreme Court Justice Lewis Powell who, in 1978, laid the groundwork for the problematic 2011 Citizens United decision. As the authors note, unchecked out-of-state donations ensure that elected officials hold no loyalty to their constituents. Their examination of media involvement proves less precise. It remains unclear whether they are positing that media conglomerates collude with business by narrowing coverage in order to rake in billions in political advertising, allow advertising .to drive the story, or roll over and play dead. The hopefulness here is in the authors' prescription: encouraging the growing movement to amend the Constitution to overturn Citizens United; a call for more robust public broadcasting; and an appeal to make voting a Constitutional guarantee. They conclude with a fervent call to all citizens to 'refuse to be ridden by a booted, and spurred favored few.'"

"Dollarocracy: How the Money and Media Election Complex is Destroying America." Publishers Weekly 22 Apr. 2013: 45. Academic OneFile. Web. 15 Oct. 2015.

This is a New Book. New Books are in front of the Reference Desk. Don't forget that you can also request books from storage! Instructions on how to do that are here.

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See our previous Books of the Week here.



Speaker Event: What Is College For?

Brought to you by the Library Media Resources Center at LaGuardia Community College:

Tuesday, November 17, 2015
2:00 PM to 3:30 PM (EST)

Join us in a talk led by Dr. Andrew Delbanco (The Alexander Hamilton Professor of American Studies, Columbia University) that will address important questions about the idea of college including:
• How can college help students become active citizens?
• How do we know if college is effective?
• How do students know they are making the most of their opportunities?

20 autographed copies of Dr. Delbanco's book, College: What it Was, Is, and Should Be, will be raffled to LaGuardia students in attendance.
Register now to reserve your seat: https://college2015.eventbrite.com

LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: Let Us Fight as Free Men: Black Soldiers and Civil Rights

Let Us Fight as Free Men: Black Soldiers and Civil Rights

Let Us Fight as Free Men: Black Soldiers and Civil Rights by Christine Knauer

"Today, the military is one the most racially diverse institutions in the United States. But for many decades African American soldiers battled racial discrimination and segregation within its ranks. In the years after World War II, the integration of the armed forces was a touchstone in the homefront struggle for equality—though its importance is often overlooked in contemporary histories of the civil rights movement. Drawing on a wide array of sources, from press reports and newspapers to organizational and presidential archives, historian Christine Knauer recounts the conflicts surrounding black military service and the fight for integration.

Let Us Fight as Free Men shows that, even after their service to the nation in World War II, it took the persistent efforts of black soldiers, as well as civilian activists and government policy changes, to integrate the military. In response to unjust treatment during and immediately after the war, African Americans pushed for integration on the strength of their service despite the oppressive limitations they faced on the front and at home. Pressured by civil rights activists such as A. Philip Randolph, President Harry S. Truman passed an executive order that called for equal treatment in the military. Even so, integration took place haltingly and was realized only after the political and strategic realities of the Korean War forced the Army to allow black soldiers to fight alongside their white comrades. While the war pushed the civil rights struggle beyond national boundaries, it also revealed the persistence of racial discrimination and exposed the limits of interracial solidarity."

from the publisher's web site

This is a New Book. New Books are in front of the Reference Desk. Don't forget that you can also request books from storage! Instructions on how to do that are here.

Ask a librarian to help you find resources on this or related books.

See our previous Books of the Week here.



LaGuardia Library Book of the Week: Infamy:The Shocking Story of the Japanese American Internment

Infamy:The Shocking Story of the Japanese American Internment in World War II

Infamy:The Shocking Story of the Japanese American Internment in World War II by Richard Reeves

"During WWII, newspapers, films, and the U.S. government regularly reminded citizens that they were fighting totalitarian governments whose populations were in constant fear of a "knock on the door," followed by rapid transport to a concentration camp. It is a sad and cruel irony that Japanese Americans, citizens and noncitizens, lived under a similar fear. The forced relocation and internment of people was a racially based insult to our purported ideals.

Reeves, an award-winning journalist, recounts the unfolding of this outrage with a justifiable sense of moral indignation. He reminds us that this was a national failure as he indicts political leaders, the courts, and ordinary citizens, many of whom were resentful of the success and prosperity of their Japanese neighbors. Although there was virtually no violent resistance, the Japanese did fight against their internment in the halls of Congress and the court system, which helped ameliorate conditions within the camps. Reeves lays out the broad outlines of the "roundup" and the structure of the camps, but he is at his best when he chronicles the experiences of particular families whose lives were ripped apart by what they went through, even as some of their young men chose to honorably serve in the military of the country that continued to detain their relatives. This is a painful but necessary and timely reminder of how overblown fears about national security can have shameful consequences."

Freeman, Jay. "Infamy: The Shocking Story of the Japanese American Internment in World War II." The Booklist 111.12 (2015): 23. ProQuest Education Journals. Web. 15 Oct. 2015.

This is a New Book. New Books are in front of the Reference Desk. Don't forget that you can also request books from storage! Instructions on how to do that are here.

Ask a librarian to help you find resources on this or related books. We have a fantastic guide on the topic, too!

See our previous Books of the Week here.